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It is one of the elements of the British airdrop capsules, which consisted of a number of segments like this. It has a simple cylinder-like structure fitted with covers. When removed from the container, the cell could be transported by its handles. Museums and private collections include few...

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It is one of the elements of the British airdrop capsules, which consisted of a number of segments like this. It has a simple cylinder-like structure fitted with covers. When removed from the container, the cell could be transported by its handles. Museums and private collections include few items like this, both due to the origins deemed as compromising during the occupation and potential other “civilian” uses after the war. The cell is a silent witness to the air support for Home Army soldiers from Western Allies and the Polish aviators who flew for Poland putting their lives in danger. The first aid flight was carried out in February 1941; the last one, in December 1944.
Airdropped capsules contained items necessary for the fight. Their content varied depending on the time and the capacity of the 6th Division of the Chief Commander's General Staff, which were involved in communication with the occupied country, including the airdrop of materials and Special Force Paratroopers—soldiers specially trained in England and deployed in Poland to carry out special missions.  The content of the capsules also depended on the demand reported by the receiving party — the Home Army. Items most frequently found in the capsules in various proportions included mostly the following: Sten Mk II and Mk III machine guns, the trophy German machine gun, MP 40; another trophy machine gun, Beretta; .38 Revolver, .45 Revolver, Colt M1911A and ammunition for those arms; a hand grenade No 36 (Mills), time pencils (pencil-like time fuses), Gammon (fuses and, separately, explosives for grenades), mine and sabotage materials and flares. Bulkier items were dropped as packets or containers with a non-compartmentalised loading space. These included radio equipment, machine guns (light British machine gun, Bren, and trophy German machine guns, MG 34 and 42, long rifles like the trophy Mauser rifles) and clothing—uniforms and shoes. The metal sheet cylinder with an unassuming shape is loaded with a more serious historical context than it might seem.

Elaborated by the Museum of the Home Army dedicated Gen. Emil Fieldorf “Nil”, © all rights reserved

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Drum-like airdrop capsule, the so-called “little cell”

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