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A dog tag is an inextricable part of a contemporary soldier's equipment. The dog tag allows one to identify the corpse of a soldier. This dog tag epitomises the improvisation in the combat conditions of the Warsaw Uprising...

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A dog tag is an inextricable part of a contemporary soldier's equipment. The dog tag allows one to identify the corpse of a soldier. This dog tag epitomises the improvisation in the combat conditions of the Warsaw Uprising. This specimen was probably made from a copper sheet owned or found in storehouses during the first days of battle.
The dog tag is a copper sheet circle that is 1.4 mm thick. Its obverse bears the Roman numeral ‘III’ struck on by hand. The reverse features the letter N close to one of the holes. The dog tag belonged to the brother of the person who gave the dog tag to the Museum — Kazimierz Kazik Piotrowski, a soldier from the 3rd Konrad — KRYBAR Group, fighting in the Warsaw Uprising. After the group had surrendered, Kazik was imprisoned as a POW at Stalag XI B Fallingbostel camp. 

Elaborated by the Museum of the Home Army dedicated Gen. Emil Fieldorf “Nil”, © all rights reserved

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Kazimierz Piotrowski’s dog tag from the Warsaw Uprising

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