List of all exhibits. Click on one of them to go to the exhibit page. The topics allow exhibits to be selected by their concept categories. On the right, you can choose the settings of the list view.

The list below shows links between exhibits in a non-standard way. The points denote the exhibits and the connecting lines are connections between them, according to the selected categories.

Enter the end dates in the windows in order to set the period you are interested in on the timeline.

Views: 4978
(Votes: 2)
The average rating is 5.0 stars out of 5.
Print metrics
Print description

Appellative of crinoids (Crinoidea) comes  from the Greek words krinon, which means lily, and eidos ‒ form. This marine animals characterized by calyx-shape body, have also the stem and arms. Crinoids lived in prehistoric sea c. 200 million years ago. They belonged to the echinoderms.

more

Appellative of crinoids (Crinoidea) comes  from the Greek words krinon, which means lily, and eidos ‒ form. This marine animals characterized by calyx-shape body, have also the stem and arms. Crinoids lived in prehistoric sea c. 200 million years ago. They belonged to the echinoderms. Crinoids after death sank to the bottom and underwent mineralization in growing settlements. Their skeleton usually was falling apart, that is why usually we can find only the fragments of their bodies, very rarely the whole skeletons are preserved. The present specimen comes from an old paleontological collection. It is unique for the sake of preserved calyx with stems together.

Elaborated by the Geological Museum at the Faculty of Geology, Geophysics and Environmental Protection of the AGH University of Science and Technology, editorial team of Małopolska’s Virtual Museums, © all rights reserved

less

Daylilies are not just flowers (In actual fact they are... The thing is, that in Polish, daylilies and crinoids bear the same name)

Crinoids are one of the classes of animals that make up the phylum Echinodermata, which includes about 700 species of marine invertebrates, mainly found in deep waters. Their body resembles a goblet; they have five or more feathery arms, edged with feathery processes which contain their reproductive organs. There are also numerous tube feet placed on them, which perform a sensory function. The arms of the crinoids are equipped with so-called gutters, with tiny, hairy cell processes – the cilia – transporting food to the mouth. Their very characteristic internal skeleton makes thousands of extinct species extremely important Palaeozoic index fossils.

more

Crinoids are one of the classes of animals that make up the phylum Echinodermata, which includes about 700 species of marine invertebrates, mainly found in deep waters. Their body resembles a goblet; they have five or more feathery arms, edged with feathery processes which contain their reproductive organs. There are also numerous tube feet placed on them, which perform a sensory function. The arms of the crinoids are equipped with so-called gutters, with tiny, hairy cell processes – the cilia – transporting food to the mouth. Their very characteristic internal skeleton makes thousands of extinct species extremely important Palaeozoic index fossils.
Some crinoids have a stem which attaches them to the seabed. The stem consists of polygonal or round segments. It is muscular and possesses innervation, thanks to which it can move. However, most modern crinoids are stemless. Nowadays, they number only about 100 genera, living mainly in deep waters.
Interestingly, they are currently the food of some fish, and therefore they have developed a number of defensive adaptations to protect themselves against predation. These adaptations are, above all, conducting a nocturnal way of life, great ability to regenerate lost body parts, as well as the ability to produce toxic substances.
Crinoids belong to as many as 5600 species. Unfortunately, 5000 of them are already extinct. The first of them appeared in the Ordovician period and some still exist today. The heyday of the crinoids lasted from the Devonian to Carboniferous periods. At that time, they formed some kind of crinoid meadows in the contemporary water bodies. After death, their skeletons fell apart very quickly, which is why their plates and stem segments are most often encountered separately.
(See what the remains of crinoids look like).
During the disastrous Permian mass extinction, almost all Palaeozoic crinoid subclasses went extinct. However, in the early Triassic, out of the few individuals who managed to survive, the only contemporary class was created – articulata.  Later, in the Triassic period, a taxa of crinoids appeared whose stems were significantly reduced in size. Thanks to this, these animals could change their current lifestyle to a little bit less sedentary one. In consequence, they started to appear as nekton or plankton.
Most fossil crinoids measured only several dozen centimetres. The largest crinoids, on the other hand, called Jurassic crinoids, grew even up to 19 meters! In the German town of Holzmaden, in one of the Jurassic slates, as many as fifty complete crinoids were discovered and they all were more than 10 meters long.

Elaborated by Editorial team of Małopolskas Virtual Museums,
Licencja Creative Commons

 This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Poland License.


 

 

 

See:
Crinoids from the Geological Museum at the Faculty of Geology, Geophysics and Environmental Protection of the AGH University of Science and Technology

Bibliography:
Encyklopedia Audiowizualna Britannica, cz. I: Zoologia, Kurpisz S. A., Poznań 2006 [na podstawie Britannica- edycja polska, pp. 114—115, https://pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liliowce_(zwierz%C4%99ta)]

less

Crinoids

Pictures

Links

INTERPRETATIONS

Game

See also


Recent comments

Add comment: