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The presented drawing is the first student work by Jacek Malczewski to be noticed and awarded. He received the first prize and the amount of 30 guilders from the management of the Kraków Society of Friends of Fine Arts. At that time, Malczewski studied under Władysław Łuszczkiewicz and Feliks Szynalewski, with Jan Matejko also exerting a tremendous influence on the artistic development of the young adept.

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The presented drawing is the first student work by Jacek Malczewski to be noticed and awarded. He received the first prize and the amount of 30 guilders from the management of the Kraków Society of Friends of Fine Arts. At that time, Malczewski studied under Władysław Łuszczkiewicz and Feliks Szynalewski, with Jan Matejko also exerting a tremendous influence on the artistic development of the young adept. Matejko, who in his letter to Malczewski’s father – Julian – praised his son’s talent, noticed that his “drawings (…) seem to indicate and promise a singular painting talent”. He also assured: “In this son of yours, God willing, I will await the continuator of my name”[1]. Matejko admitted Jacek Malczewski to his studio only a year later – in 1875.
Already in his school days, Malczewski appeared to be a good draftsman, who in his treatment of the human body “simplifies the form, endows it with features of stern gravity. This is especially visible in the treatment of the human body. It always possesses a perfect expression of motion; it is a perfectly built mechanism. (…) He emphasizes the skeleton and musculature, extends and thickens the legs, enlarges the model’s feet”[2].

Bibliography:

  1. [1] A. Heydel, Jacek Malczewski. Życie i dzieło, Kraków 1933, p. 63, 228.
  2. [2] Ibid., p. 176.

Elaborated by Urszula Kozakowska-Zaucha (National Museum in Kraków),Licencja Creative Commons

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Poland License.

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“Study of a male nude figure” by Jacek Malczewski

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