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Emanuel Edmund Herncisz (1858–1885) studied at the School of Fine Arts in Kraków under Władysław Łuszczkiewicz, Leopold Loeffler and Jan Matejko during the period 1874–1882. Thanks to the scholarship of the Austrian government, during the period 1882–1883, after completing his education in Kraków, Herncisz went on to study at the Munich academy. In 1883, the artist made a trip to Italy, where he planned to return with Seweryn Bieszczad to take up painting studies. The artist’s plans were scuppered by tuberculosis, which would lead to his death two years later.

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Emanuel Edmund Herncisz (1858–1885) studied at the School of Fine Arts in Kraków under Władysław Łuszczkiewicz, Leopold Loeffler and Jan Matejko during the period 1874–1882. Thanks to the scholarship of the Austrian government, during the period 1882–1883, after completing his education in Kraków, Herncisz went on to study at the Munich academy. In 1883, the artist made a trip to Italy, where he planned to return with Seweryn Bieszczad to take up painting studies. The artist’s plans were scuppered by tuberculosis, which would lead to his death two years later.
Herncisz painted genre scenes primarily from rural life and historical paintings. His work was influenced by his experiences from Munich and the art of Jan Matejko. The painter exhibited works at the Society of Friends of Fine Arts in Kraków, the Society for the Encouragement of Fine Arts and the Zachęta Salon in Warsaw, as well as in the Krywult salon in Lviv, Munich and Budapest. His works can be found at the Library of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Matejko House, at the National Museum in Kraków and in the collections of the Academy of Fine Arts in Kraków.
The presented academic study of an ancient statue by Herncisz was created in 1877 during his studies at the School of Fine Arts – the artist received an award for it. Herncisz made a drawing basing on the plaster cast of Medici Apollo, also known as Apollino. The original statue was found in Rome in the eighteenth century and became the decoration of the art collection in Villa Borghese, and later in the Villa Medici. Currently, the statue is kept in the Uffizi gallery in Florence.
Apollino is a Roman sculpture referring to Hellenistic statues in the type of Lycian Apollo. This type of depicting the deity as a slender, naked youth is derived from the art of Praxiteles of Athens – a Greek sculptor of the late-classical period who became famous for creating a new canon of ideal proportions of the human body. The Praxitelite Canon replaced the previous paragon developed by Poliklet of Argos.
The statue depicts a naked, youthful Apollo leaning against a tree trunk. The figure, bent in an s-shape, stands in a deep contrapposto. The left hand is raised above the head, and the right one in which Apollo wielded the bow rests on a tree from which a quiver with arrows hangs down.
The sculpture depicted in the picture is probably identical to one of the two plaster casts defined in the sources as “Apollino”, purchased in 1818 for the School of Drawing and Painting at the Jagiellonian University. One of them was purchased in Warsaw by Józef Peszka, and the other in Vienna by Józef Brodowski.

Elaborated by Adam Spodaryk (Editorial team of Małopolska’s Virtual Museums),
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Poland License.

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“Apollino” by Emanuel Herncisz

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