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Marceli Harasimowicz was born in 1859. He spent his childhood as an émigré in Switzerland and Paris. In 1872, together with his brother and mother, he returned to Poland, where during the period 1873–1879 he studied at the School of Fine Arts in Kraków.

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Marceli Harasimowicz was born in 1859. He spent his childhood as an émigré in Switzerland and Paris. In 1872, together with his brother and mother, he returned to Poland, where during the period 1873–1879 he studied at the School of Fine Arts in Kraków. He continued his artistic education at the Vienna Academy (1880–1881) and Munich Academy (1883–1885). From 1885, Harasimowicz created his works in Lviv, where he died in 1935. The presented academic study of an ancient bust was drawn by Harasimowicz in 1876 during his studies at the School of Fine Arts. The study was made on the basis of the plaster copy of a Roman replica of a Hellenistic portrait. The bronze bust of an old man was found in 1754 during the excavations in Herculaneum, and now it is kept in the Museo archeologico nazionale in Naples. It is probable that the cast depicted in the drawing is identical to a plaster copy of Seneca’s bust which was bought by Józef Peszka in Warsaw in 1818. At first it was thought that it was a portrait of Seneca. Currently, however, it is known that the bust does not represent the Roman author and is therefore most often referred to as the portrait of Pseudo-Seneca. Some scholars believe that sculpture is an imagined likeness of Hesiod or Aristophanes.

Elaborated by Adam Spodaryk (Editorial team of Małopolska’s Virtual Museums),
Licencja Creative Commons

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Poland License.

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“Old man’s bust” by Marceli Harasimowicz

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