List of all exhibits. Click on one of them to go to the exhibit page. The topics allow exhibits to be selected by their concept categories. On the right, you can choose the settings of the list view.

The list below shows links between exhibits in a non-standard way. The points denote the exhibits and the connecting lines are connections between them, according to the selected categories.

Enter the end dates in the windows in order to set the period you are interested in on the timeline.

Views: 5602
(Votes: 2)
The average rating is 5.0 stars out of 5.
Print metrics
Print description

The casket is cubical in shape and consist of six rectangular ivory plates bound together with metal nails and fittings. The top plate is fitted with hinges and serves as the lid. The front side is fitted with a rectangular lock decorated with an image of a tower and two persons: a woman with a large key in her hand and a man on his knees with his hands joined together. On the lid, there is a metal handle engraved in a diagonal checked pattern filled with simplified flowers. On the side plates, there are twelve figural scenes from medieval chance de geste, while on the lid, there are three court scenes. Narration in all of these images follows from the left to the right. The front side features the following images: Conversation of Alexander the Great with Aristotle, Phyllis and Aristotle, Thisbe and lion, Death of Pyramus and Thisbe, while the back side features: Lancelot fighting a lion, Lancelot crossing the Sword Bridge, Gauvain on the Dangerous Bed and Damsels freed by Gauvain. The left side features: Tristan and Iseult’s Meeting in the Garden, the Hunt of the Unicorn, while the right side features: Enyas’ fight with a savage and Old Porter Welcomes Galahad. The lead features a Knight Tournament in the centre, flanked by two scenes which together depict the motif of Siege of the Castle of Love.
The Kraków casket is one of seven so called complex caskets, which can be found in world’s most important collections of medieval art.

more

The casket is cubical in shape and consist of six rectangular ivory plates bound together with metal nails and fittings. The top plate is fitted with hinges and serves as the lid. The front side is fitted with a rectangular lock decorated with an image of a tower and two persons: a woman with a large key in her hand and a man on his knees with his hands joined together. On the lid, there is a metal handle engraved in a diagonal checked pattern filled with simplified flowers. On the side plates, there are twelve figural scenes from medieval chance de geste, while on the lid, there are three court scenes. Narration in all of these images follows from the left to the right. The front side features the following images: Conversation of Alexander the Great with Aristotle, Phyllis and Aristotle, Thisbe and lion, Death of Pyramus and Thisbe, while the back side features: Lancelot fighting a lion, Lancelot crossing the Sword Bridge, Gauvain on the Dangerous Bed and Damsels freed by Gauvain. The left side features: Tristan and Iseult’s Meeting in the Garden, the Hunt of the Unicorn, while the right side features: Enyas’ fight with a savage and Old Porter Welcomes Galahad. The lead features a Knight Tournament in the centre, flanked by two scenes which together depict the motif of Siege of the Castle of Love.
In the inventory of the Wawel cathedral of 1563, the casket was recorded as a storage box for relic of various saints which needs to be repaired, carried on a portable altar during processions on the so called cross days (three days prior to Ascension). It was then placed inside a bigger casket – a reliquary. It was hidden aside, in Kraków cathedral, along with two other reliquaries, in unknown circumstances, most likely after the year 1620. It was found by coincidence during an inspection carried out by Kraków bishop Albin Dunajewski on March 18th, 1881. It was then placed in the main closet of the cathedral treasury, which was rearranged thanks to father Ignacy Polkowski, who was appointed as junior curate of the cathedral in 1877. This new closet, designed by Polkowski, inspired by the architecture of the Sigismund’s chapel, enabled exposition of the most valuable objects from the treasury to interested visitors. It must be mentioned, that it was the first and the only church treasury in Poland at that time, made available for ”tourist” purposes – on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays at 10.00 a.m. in groups of at least twelve people. Thanks to Polkowski, who also compiled a catalogue, surprisingly modern for that times, of the Wawel treasury, the casket became known outside Poland as well. In 1986, it was restored in Kraków-based studio of Wojciech Bochnak, it was also lent for a number of exhibitions in Poland and abroad.
The history of studies on the Wawel casket is long and complex. It was introduced in academic literature by father Ignacy Polkowski, as an Italian piece from the 13th century decorated with scenes from a poem by Ekkehart I of St. Gall, Waltherius manu fortis, known in Polish language version delivered by a Poznań bishop Bogufał (died in 1253). Jan Bołoz-Antoniewicz, a philologist and art historian employed at the Lvov University, in 1885 published a model and still up-to-date monograph on the literary sources of the scenes depicted on the casket. He identified correctly most of the scenes and described the piece as a French craft from the 14th century. It must be emphasised that this was a breakthrough work for the development of art history in Poland and showed a huge potential of modern approach to research on the content of works of art. Apart from that, the study made this work of art famous internationally; the monument has been well-known and discussed in works by the most important experts on court art of the 14th century and ivory sculpture. Findings of Bołoz-Antoniewicz were complemented in the 20th century by a number of researchers, mostly French and German, and recently, by a Polish art historian, Agnieszka Łaguna. Findings of Raymond Koechlin were decisive for the stylistic studies of the casket. He identified the piece as made in Paris in the 1st half of the 14th century and included in the so called group of complex caskets – with a compilation of images drawn from various literary works. A French art historian of Polish origin, Louis Grodecki, dated the monument more precisely to the 2nd quarter of the 14th century, while Danielle Gaborit-Chopin connected the casket to a Paris-based workshop called Atelier of diptych with arch frieze in Louvre, which operated in the 2nd half of the 14th century.
The Kraków casket is one of seven so called complex caskets, which can be found in world’s most important collections of medieval art: Walters Art Galery in Baltimore, British Museum in London, Victoria and Albert Museum in London, Barber Institute of Fine Arts in Birmingham, Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, and Museo Nazionale del Bargello in Florence. It is the only one, however, with a beautifully decorated lock preserved in an excellent condition. Due to the structure and composition, it is the closest to the Florence casket, while the style resembles the one of diptych with scenes from the Passion of Christ and the Life of Mary in Louvre and diptych with Adoration of the Magi and Cruxiciction in Victoria and Albert Museum in London, which is connected to the so called atelier of diptych with arch frieze in Louvre.
The Kraków piece is one of the most interesting works of art preserved to-date depicting scenes from medieval chanson de geste. Similar caskets with decorations praising the notion of court love usually belonged to troosseau or were offered as jewel boxes to fiancées after engagement. The most exposed part of the casket – the lid – is decorated with a scene of knights jousting, which was the essence of medieval feudal culture. In the middle, a fight of two knights was depicted in a way typical for iconography related to such celebrations. The knights meet by the podium where young ladies and ladies-in-waiting sit and their favour is undoubtedly the desired prize. The most characteristic element of a tournament armour is a great helm, which became popular in the 1st half of the 13th century and were slowly becoming outdated throughout the next century. When they lost value in battle, there were transformed into elements of a tournament armour and full dress. The most often used great helms, whose bottom ridge rested upon a knight’s shoulders, had to be pierced in the front area for ventilation. Helmets from the 14th century are characteristic for expressive design with a number of broken lines. Also crests decorating tournament helmets were an important element and served to demonstrate the grandeur and high social position of the knights. In court of art of the 13th century, images of armoured men were quite popular. They depicted elements of armour in great detail; thorough knowledge of this field was an important part of “education” in that age. The same scope of court events, but of a more erotic character this time, is represented by the image of the Sieg of the Castle of Love, which was a courtly game consisting in throwing flowers at ladies and capturing a ”castle” they were defending. These motif is deeply enrooted in the French tradition, yet it might have been very attractive and clearly understood in Central Europe. The tradition of jousting was brought to Hungary by king Charles Robert d’Anjou and it dated back to the coronation of this ruler (c. 1310). The first tournament of which we know was organised on the wedding of Charles Robert with Beatrix of Luxemburg, while the subsequent tournaments accompanied his marriage to Elisabeth, the daughter of Polish king, Władysław the Elbow-high, in early July of 1320, as well as the first convention of Visegrád in 1335. In 1326, the first knight order in Hungary was established. St George was adopted as its saint patron.
Sides of the casket are decorated with scenes from the most popular chanson de geste, which had been created by travelling poets and singers – troubadours. Some of them settled in courts with time and achieved high status, while their songs were written down and repeated and enjoyed great popularity across the whole Christian world. They gave the most popular stories, e.g of Arthur and the knights of the round table, a sophisticated literary form. This is the source of the „career” of such knights as Gawain, Galahad, and Lancelot of the Lake, Arthur’s companions, who were considered as perfect knights for many centuries. Troubadours often drew their inspiration from ancient times in order to add authority to their stories and make them more universal. The story of Pyramus and Thisbe depicted on the casket originates from Ovid’s Metamorphoses. Young lovers from two feuding families met a horrible fate. Due to a misunderstanding, Pyramus believed that Thisbe was devoured by a lion and committed a suicide. The miserable girl followed him soon to the grave. Among these stories, especially popular was the one of Aristotle, the greatest philosopher of the ancient times, and his humiliation by beautiful Phyllis, a mistress of Alexander the Great. When Aristotle tried to persuade Alexander to give up his passionate affair to return to science and warfare training, Phyllis lured the philosopher, with promises known to her alone, to let her ride him around the castle, which entertained the whole court greatly. This story appeared both in collections of exempla – moral stories used by preachers (in Jacques de Vitry’s works for the first time) and in lay literature as a warning against the power of female charm which leads even the wisest and virtuous men to the sin of unchastity. This theme was very popular in the art of the 14th century, including monumental sculpture and architecture. It was used in decoration of, for example, French cathedrals in Rouen – in the transept portal (Portail de la Calende, c. 1300) and Lyon – (façade, c 1310), town hall in Cologne (c. 1360), and on the stalls in the Cologne cathedral (1311). In Kraków, it was presented in 1360s, on one of the southern consoles in the chancel of St Mary’s Basilica at the Main Market Square.
The scene of the Hunt of the Unicorn is especially important in regard to the choice of scenes for the casket. It was believed in the Middle Ages that elephant’s tusks came from the biblical land of Sheba and were mistakenly considered (just like narwhal’s tusks) for the „corns” of unicorns. These mythical creatures had been perceived as symbols of purity (they allegedly preferred to died than stain their spotless white fur with dirt) since late ancient ages. Therefore, a belief that only a virgin was able to capture a timid unicorn was firmly established, which was reflected in numerous pieces of art. Therefore, this animal was associated symbolically with Virgin Mary. The hunt was executed in such a way that a unicorn was driven towards the maiden and when it sensed her presence, it would approach her voluntarily and rest its head on her womb. In reality, ivory was imported to Europe from Africa through harbours in Ethiopia, Alexandria, Acre, or Famagusta.
When the casket was found in 1881, a legendary connection of this item to queen Jadwiga d’Anjou was formed and express in art, for example in the series of pastel drawings Skarbiec katedry wawelskiej [Treasury of the Wawel cathedral] by Leon Wyczółkowski, 1907 (Warsaw, National Museum, inventory no 180841, 180842). It is not, however, supported by any written documents, just like it is in the case of an ivory diptych from the Czartoryski Museum in Kraków. It must be kept in mind that the casket was found at a very particular time. Kraków diocese had no leader for several decades, because after the death of bishop Karol Skórkowski, who was banished for supporting the November Uprising openly, no successor was appointed. An ingres of a new ordinary, Albin Dunajewski, took place as late as on June 8th, 1879, and was perceived as a symbolic rebirth of the ”ancient” Kraków diocese. On the patriotic wave, efforts for beatification of queen Jadwiga were doubled and all monuments of Poland’s part and grandeur became memorabilia deer to all Poles under the three partitions. The idea of connecting significant monuments and works of art with famous figures from Polish history was at its height then.
French family connections of the Hungarian branch of the d’Anjou dynasty might speak for the hypothesis that the casket was connected to queen Jadwiga. Presence of luxurious French goods at Jadwiga’s court is highly probable, because written sources confirm her interest in art. Most of her known foundations were of religious character, because the queen was renown for passionate piety in the sense of devotio moderna. The fact that she cared for the Wawel cathedral’s equipment is proved by the rationale of Kraków bishops (an element of liturgical clothing that emphasises a special status of the Kraków diocese in the Church hierarchy), which is in whole embroidered with pearls, and scyfus (Dresden, Grünes Gewölbe) – a representative cup (originally for layman use) with an inscription dedicated to St Wenceslaus. Jadwiga’s religious needs and high culture are also expressed in the Psałterz Floriański [St Florian Psalter] (Kraków, Jagiellonian Library), which was made on her request, richly illuminated, Including Latin version of the psalms along with their translations into Polish and German. The queen also possessed one of the oldest preserved manuscripts of the Visions of St Bridget of Sweden, decorated with miniatures and ornamental initials, made in Naples (Warsaw, National Library). The most interesting works of art in Central Europe include a huge wooden mystic-type crucifix (with exposed and even exaggerated traces of suffering, originally covered in realistic polychrome), preserved in Kraków cathedral. It was most likely imported from Italy. Queen Jadwiga played an important role in bringing Slavic Benedictines (who celebrated liturgy in the Slavic language) from Prague to Kraków. She founded the Holy Cross church (not preserved until present times) for them. She also supported the Carmelites, for whom she founded – together with Jagiełło – huge churches in Kraków and Poznań (in the latter one, a beautiful stone console with a carved Anjou coat of arms was preserved). Numerous works of craft mentioned in written sources were related to her court. It is known, for example, that a new crown was made for her coronation because the royal insignia founded for the coronation of Władysław the Elbow-high were taken to Hungary by king Louis the Great and were returned to Kraków only as a result of Władysław Jagiełło’s efforts in 1412.
The Wawel casket is a typical example of works of art imported in the Middle Ages because of their high artistic value. Valuable items were assigned a secondary function of reliquaries, regardless of the decorations, whose themes were drawn from sources other than religious art. For example, an Arabic ivory casket from the 11th century, preserved in Burgos (Museo arqueologico provincial), was turned into a reliquary in the Abbey of Santo Domingo de Silos. Another great example of such practice is related to a casket of silver plate, preserved in the Wawel cathedral treasury, called Saracenic-Sicillian, whose sides are decorated with images of wild animals fighting and knights fighting with wild beasts. It was made in the Middle east or Sicilly, most likely in the 12th century, and after remodelling (lock and hinges were added later, in the 12th/13th century), it started to be used as a reliquary.

Elaborated by Marek Walczak, PhD (The Institute of Art History), editorial team of Małopolska’s Virtual Museums, © all rights reserved

 

less

Principles of courtly love

In the late Middle Ages, popular romances and knight poems, as well as legends from the north, had an enormous influence on court culture. On their basis, court customs developed, an essential aspect of which was an image of ideal love. This was reflected in the ceremonies glorifying the figure of a lady. The decoration of a small case from the 2nd quarter of the 14th century is some kind of interpretation of the medieval world-view, centred around courtly love, which — interestingly — was an ethical problem. Its moralistic and didactic themes, having literary sources, evoked good and bad examples of behaviour, building the principles of proper behaviour.

more

In the late Middle Ages, popular romances and knight poems, as well as legends from the north, had an enormous influence on court culture. On their basis, court customs developed, an essential aspect of which was an image of ideal love. This was reflected in the ceremonies glorifying the figure of a lady. The decoration of a small case from the 2nd quarter of the 14th century is some kind of interpretation of the medieval world-view, centred around courtly love, which — interestingly — was an ethical problem. Its moralistic and didactic themes, having literary sources, evoked good and bad examples of behaviour, building the principles of proper behaviour.

A chest lid: courtly entertainments
Middle scene: a tournament
A duel was an extremely important element of medieval knighthood culture. Special competitions were organized at court, which put the skills of knights to the test. The fight itself was dedicated to the ladies who closely watched the battle taking place in front of them. Staging various scenes derived from chivalric romance was also a popular form of entertainment during tournaments.

The scene on the left: conquering the castle of love

This game consisted in building a makeshift construction, which was the titular castle of love, in which ladies were imprisoned. The knights, using only flowers, were supposed to breach the construction and release the trapped ladies.

The lid lock: receiving the key to the castle
The efforts of the knights were rewarded: they received the key to the castle of love in order to free the ladies.

The scene on the right: courtship
Each of the knights released the lady of his heart, and then courted her. The scene presents different circumstances and methods for showing courtship to a lady, for example, during a joint ride or a boat trip.

The front wall: lustful love versus righteous love
Two scenes on the left: Aristotle and Filis
A moralizing anecdote tells the story of Aristotle, who instructed Aleksander to leave his lover — Filis — because she was the reason why he had neglected his duties as a ruler. Alexander plotted an intrigue with her in order to ridicule the teacher. He arranged Aristotle and Filis’s meeting in the garden, during which the beautiful woman seduced the sage, who fell in love with her to such an extent that he let Filis ride on his own back, which Aleksander observed with satisfaction.

Two scenes on the right: Pyram and Tysbe
The story of the lovers is taken from Ovid’s Metamorphoses. Pyram and Tysbe had been close to each other since they were children; however, they came from two feuding families, which forced them to meet in secret. During one of the meetings — when Tysbe was waiting for her beloved — a lion appeared, from which she hid on a tree, losing her coat in the course of the flight. Pyram, having arrived at the place, saw the lion tearing up the coat of his beloved and — thinking that she had died — stabbed himself with a knife out of despair. Upon seeing this, Tysbe, killed herself immediately after her beloved, using the same blade.

The rear wall: recognition of the knightly defence of a lady
Two scenes on the left: Lancelot
Lancelot was the greatest of the knights of the Round Table. His name was made famous by the adventures he had experienced during the search for the abducted Queen Guinevere — wife of King Arthur — known from the Arthurian Legends. The scenes from the chest present individual episodes of his story; namely, the tests which the brave knight had to pass in order to find his beloved queen. Those were, for example: fighting a lion and crossing a sword bridge.

Two scenes on the right: Gawain
Gawain was a nephew of King Arthur, whom we also know from the legends of the Knights of the Round Table. He had many unusual adventures during the quest to find the Holy Grail. One of them is illustrated by the scenes presented on the chest. Once, Gawain stopped in an enchanted castle, whose host offered him hospitality. The knight prudently went to sleep in his armour, thanks to which he survived the night, because his bed turned out to be full of sharp swords. When he managed to escape unscathed, a lion appeared in the chamber, which he had to fight. Gawain’s efforts were not in vain, because, in consequence, he freed the ladies imprisoned in the castle.

Left side: false love versus pure (platonic) love

The scene on the right: a unicorn hunt
Legends related to the unicorn taken from Physiologus — an ancient treatise — were extremely widespread in the Middle Ages and repeated in bestiaries. The unicorn symbolized purity, hence — according to legend — only a virgin could tame it as the animal rested beside her, laying its head on her womb. Only then could the hunters approach it in order to seize it. The stories associated with the magical properties of the unicorn gained deep Christian symbolism, but — in the context of platonic courtly love — the animal embodied a medieval female lover.

The scene on the left: Tristan and Isolde

The story of the unhappy love of Tristan and Isolde was extremely popular in the Middle Ages. The lovers — bound together by passion thanks to magic — met in secret. When King Mark — Isolde’s husband — found out, he decided to eavesdrop on them during the next tryst. Tristan and Isolde fortunately saw the head of the king hiding in the water reflected in the surface of the water, so they conducted an innocent conversation, dispelling his suspicions.

The right-hand side: fighting for wrong reasons versus fighting for a righteous purpose
The scene on the right: Enyas
The figure of the old knight Enyas is known from chivalrous romances, such as Lancelot or Tristram. The depiction discussed here shows an episode in which Enyas rescues a girl from the hands of a wild man. After the debacle, they both meet a young knight who wants to duel with him over the girl. Enyas — being sure of her decision — decides to give her a choice. The girl, however, rejects the old man in favour of the young knight, which provokes Enyas to fight him. Defeating the opponent, the old knight abandons the girl in the forest.

Stage on the left: Galahad
Galahad is the son of Lancelot and the sorceress acting as the guardian of the Holy Grail. He was one of the Knights of the Round Table, whose story focused on the quest for the Holy Grail, and who — as the worthiest of all the companions — finally found it. During his journey, he experienced various adventures, including the fight with seven knights, whose defeat resulted in the freeing of the ladies trapped in the castle. The scene on the chest depicts the moment when Galahad is greeted by an old man and handed the key to this castle.

The scenes, created on the basis of the same literary sources and court customs, made use of decorated objects of everyday use made of ivory, produced in Parisian workshops in the 14th century. They were primarily boxes, chests, or mirror frames. Their numerous examples — from collections of institutions all around the world — have been brought together on the project website Gothic Ivories.

Elaborated by Paulina Kluz (Editorial team of Małopolska’s Virtual Museums),
Licencja Creative Commons

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Poland License.

Bibliography:
Agnieszka Łaguna, Gotycka skrzyneczka z kości słoniowej w Skarbcu katedralnym na Wawelu, „Studia Waweliana”, t. VI–VII (1997/1998), pp. 5–28;
Marek Walczak, Skrzyneczka, [w:] Wawel 1000-2000, t. 1: Katedra Krakowska – biskupia, królewska, narodowa, katalog wystawy w Muzeum Katedralnym na Wawelu, 05–09.2000, red. Magdalena Piwocka, Dariusz Nowacki, Kraków 2000, kat. I/12, pp. 43–45.

less

History of enshrining relics

The history of medieval reliquaries begins with the 62nd decree of the Fourth Council of the Lateran in 1215 where the issue of enshrining holy relics was raised. They were supposed to be enshrined and presented only in protective reliquaries. It was the reason why reliquaries took various forms throughout the centuries...

more

The history of medieval reliquaries begins with the 62nd decree of the Fourth Council of the Lateran in 1215 where the issue of enshrining holy relics was raised. They were supposed to be enshrined and presented only in protective reliquaries. It was the reason why reliquaries took various forms throughout the centuries.
A reliquary cross made of precious metal and with precious stones inlaid became most popular. Architectural forms resembling richly decorated miniature cases, small houses, or shrines were also common.
Reliquaries also started to take on a more anthropomorphic form in the shape of human body parts as well as herms. The origin of herms is very interesting as their history dates back to ancient times. A herm – from Greek ἕρμα – initially referred to representations of a bust or the head of Hermes which crowned a quadrangular column, narrowed at the bottom. In Greece until the 5th century BC, there was also a representation of a phallus placed in a herm. Subsequent herms depicted also other gods and heroes. In the Roman Empire, sculptured or cast bronze heads and busts constituted a common item in the houses of the rich Patrician class as well as being carried in funeral processions. Busts were also placed along roads and at street corners.
In 14th century Cologne, the most popular medieval type of herm that was produced is known as Ursulabüste; it was made of wood in the form of a young womans bust, with an open-work oculus which made it possible for the faithful to see relics. Its name derives from Saint Ursula who, according to one of the medieval legends, was a Breton princess slain together with the Eleven Thousand Virgins by the Huns in Cologne. It was the turning point during the siege of the city, which survived thanks to their sacrifice. The Saint and the rest of the virgin martyrs were buried in Cologne from where her cult started to spread. The relics of Ursula and her partners began to be sold or sent to different religious centres in Europe, which increased the demand for reliquary herms.
According to 14th-century tradition, herms were located on altars. They could constitute the completion of predella retabulum, as separate forms or groups consisting of several representations. Very often special altarpieces were made which also performed the role of a shelter for reliquaries. In time this solution was recognised as canonical for all reliquaries placed in altarpieces. Reliquaries connected to altars were supposed to remind one about saint martyrs and also gave weight to the creation of the human body in His image, after His likeness as well as the emphasised faith in the resurrection of the body and everlasting life.
At first, herm reliquaries contained skull relics but later constituted a framing for various fragments of saints bodies. Nowadays, herms usually do not contain relics any more but are still part of the tradition of veneration of saints.

Elaborated by the Editorial team of Małopolska’s Virtual Museums,
Licencja Creative Commons

 This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Poland License.

See:
Reliquary with St. Stanislaus’s hand

Gothic reliquary herm

less

Średniowieczne kobiety fatalne

W drugiej ćwierci XIV wieku w Paryżu kwitła produkcja luksusowych przedmiotów dekorowanych rzeźbionymi w kości słoniowej przedstawieniami związanymi z dworską kulturą i literaturą świecką. Szczególnie interesująca jest grupa skrzyneczek (zachowanych w całości lub we fragmentach), dekorowanych kompilacjami scen z romansów średniowiecznych. Wśród nich jest także zabytek ze skarbca krakowskiej katedry, eksponowany dziś w Muzeum Katedralnym na Wawelu. Inne egzemplarze, o bardzo zbliżonym programie dekoracji, znajdują się w The Barber Institute of Fine Arts w Birmingham, w The British Museum w Londynie, w Metropolitan Museum of Art w Nowym Jorku, w Musée de Cluny (Musée national du Moyen Âge) w Paryżu, w Museo Nazionale del Bargello we Florencji, w Victoria and Albert Museum w Londynie oraz w Walters Art Museum w Baltimore. Część badaczy do grupy tej zalicza również tak zwaną Skrzyneczkę Gorta, przechowywaną dziś w Winnipeg Art Gallery.

more

Magdalena Łanuszka

W drugiej ćwierci XIV wieku w Paryżu kwitła produkcja luksusowych przedmiotów dekorowanych rzeźbionymi w kości słoniowej przedstawieniami związanymi z dworską kulturą i literaturą świecką. Szczególnie interesująca jest grupa skrzyneczek (zachowanych w całości lub we fragmentach), dekorowanych kompilacjami scen z romansów średniowiecznych. Wśród nich jest także zabytek ze skarbca krakowskiej katedry, eksponowany dziś w Muzeum Katedralnym na Wawelu. Inne egzemplarze, o bardzo zbliżonym programie dekoracji, znajdują się w The Barber Institute of Fine Arts w Birmingham, w The British Museum w Londynie, w Metropolitan Museum of Art w Nowym Jorku, w Musée de Cluny (Musée national du Moyen Âge) w Paryżu, w Museo Nazionale del Bargello we Florencji, w Victoria and Albert Museum w Londynie oraz w Walters Art Museum w Baltimore. Część badaczy do grupy tej zalicza również tak zwaną Skrzyneczkę Gorta, przechowywaną dziś w Winnipeg Art Gallery.

Tzw. skrzyneczka królowej Jadwigi, 2. ćw. XIV w., Paryż, Skarbiec Katedry na Wawelu (Muzeum Katedralne w Krakowie).
Digitalizacja: Terramap Sp. z o.o., domena publiczna


Dekoracja tych zabytków prowadzi nas przez opowieść o miłości – w różnych odsłonach – w kulturze średniowiecznej. Poza skrzyneczkami, podobne treści dekorowały inne średniowieczne przedmioty z kości słoniowej, tworzone głównie dla dam: oprawy lusterek, grzebienie albo plakietki, które mogły być okładkami notatników.

Grzebień z kości słoniowej dekorowany scenami romansowymi, Paryż, ok. 1320,
Victoria and Albert Museum w Londynie, A.560–1910


Poza scenami ilustrującymi motywy powiązane z ideałami miłości dwornej, miłości wiernej lub miłości czystej znajdziemy w tych luksusowych przedmiotach przedstawienia, które można by było podsumować kultowym cytatem z filmu Psy: „bo to zła kobieta była…”. I przy okazji okazuje się, że nie zawsze w sztuce średniowiecznej piękno uosabiało dobro: oto bowiem piękne młode kobiety mogły występować po prostu w roli femmes fatales.

Porzucony dla młodszego

Skrzyneczka z kości słoniowej – detal (krótszy bok prawy: Enyas i Dziki Człowiek oraz Galahad przy zamku), Paryż, ok. 1310–30,
The Metropolitan Museum of Art w Nowym Jorku, 17.190.173a, b; 1988.16


Nie wszystkie sceny dekorujące wspomniane skrzyneczki dają się osadzić w średniowiecznych tekstach literackich; niektóre mogą być ilustracjami przekazów ustnych lub romansów niezachowanych do dziś. Do takich właśnie należy historia o rycerzu Enyasie, która pojawiała się w różnych dziełach sztuki XVI wieku: zarówno w wyrobach z kości słoniowej, jak i na marginesach rękopisów (szczególnie w tzw. Godzinkach Taymouth, 2. ćw. XIV w., Yates Thompson 13, British Library w Londynie, gdzie kolejne sceny mają swoje podpisy). W opowieści tej starszy już rycerz Enyas uratował pewną damę z rąk Dzikiego Człowieka: włochatej bestii, uosabiającej brutalne popędy i nieokiełznane żądze. Niedługo później dama i Enyas spotkali młodego rycerza, który postanowił przejąć piękną panią. Niestety niewiasta wybrała młodzieńca, przedkładając jego urodę nad cnoty swojego zbawcy. Ów bezczelny rycerz zażądał także od Enyasa jego psa; zwierzę okazało się lojalniejsze od niewdzięcznej damy i nie opuściło swego pana. Młodzieniec był jednak uparty i zaatakował starca, a doświadczony Enyas zabił swojego przeciwnika. Porzucił także damę, pozostawiając ją samotną na pastwę losu.

Godzinki Taymouth, Anglia (Londyn?), 2. ćw. XIV w., The British Library w Londynie, Yates Thompson 13.
Opowieść o rycerzu Enyaszu w kolejnych scenach na dolnych marginesach kart 62-67v (wybór)


Scena walki Enyasa z Dzikim Człowiekiem na większości skrzyneczek została zestawiona z przedstawieniem rycerza Galahada odbierającego klucze do zamku, gdzie więzione były niewinne panny. To już zupełnie inna opowieść, ale warto zaznaczyć, że historia Galahada, który uwolnił owe panny, mogła być rozumiana jako nawiązanie do uwolnienia przez Chrystusa dusz sprawiedliwych z Otchłani. Poprzez to nawiązanie uwypuklona została – na zasadzie kontrastu – negatywna ocena zachowania niewdzięcznej dzieweczki, którą ocalił Enyas. Z drugiej strony, Galahad uwolnił panny zupełnie bezinteresownie, podczas gdy Enyas chyba jednak liczył na to, że uratowana dzieweczka odrzuci względy młodzieńca i pozostanie jego towarzyszką.

Tzw. skrzyneczka królowej Jadwigi – detal (krótszy bok prawy: Enyas i Dziki Człowiek oraz Galahad przy zamku)


Choć w przywołanej opowieści stary rycerz Enyas jest raczej pozytywnym bohaterem, to w innych historiach autorzy nie byli tak łaskawi dla wiekowych mężczyzn, którzy ulegli urokowi złych kobiet. Nawet antycznym autorytetom nie udało się uniknąć w średniowiecznych legendach roli starca ośmieszonego przez młodą niewiastę.  

Średniowieczna dominatrix

Skrzyneczka z kości słoniowej – detal (lewa część frontu, Arystoteles poucza Aleksandra oraz Filis na Arystotelesie),
Paryż, ok. 1310–30, The Metropolitan Museum of Art w Nowym Jorku, 17.190.173a, b; 1988.16


W pełnym średniowieczu, w okresie rozwoju uniwersytetów w Europie Zachodniej, wielkim poważaniem cieszył się Arystoteles – a jednocześnie ten starożytny filozof zaczął funkcjonować jako bohater nieco prześmiewczych opowieści. Zapewne w XIII wieku powstała legenda o Filis i Arystotelesie: oto mędrzec miał napominać Aleksandra Wielkiego, że władca zbyt wiele czasu i energii poświęca pięknej Filis. W rzeczywistości jednak filozof sam pragnął tej kuszącej kobiety – ona zaś, świadoma jego słabości, postanowiła się na nim zemścić za próbę rozbicia jej związku z Aleksandrem. Dając do zrozumienia Arystotelesowi, że być może jego żądze zostaną zaspokojone, Filis nakazała mu wystąpić w roli rumaka: wozić ją na czworakach, podczas gdy ona, założywszy mu uzdę, poganiała go batem. Aleksander Wielki był świadkiem tego upokorzenia wielkiego filozofa – na skrzyneczkach widzimy władcę, gdy naśmiewa się z obserwowanej sceny, stojąc na murach zamku w tle.

Przedstawienie Filis jadącej na Arystotelesie funkcjonowało w sztuce średniowiecznej jako alegoria grzechu rozwiązłości. Dlatego motyw ten, mimo swego erotycznego przekazu, często pojawiał się w sztuce sakralnej: w dekoracjach gotyckich kościołów (na przykład prezbiterium kościoła Mariackiego w Krakowie) albo na marginesach modlitewników.

Obsceniczna zemsta

Wergiliusz w koszu i zemsta na cesarzównie, górna część plakietki z kości słoniowej,
Paryż, ok. 13401360, Walters Art Museum w Baltimore, 71.267


Historia o Filis i Arystotelesie była często zestawiana z inną opowieścią, również popularną głównie w późnym średniowieczu; tym razem jej bohaterem był rzymski poeta Wergiliusz. Co prawda na krakowskiej skrzyneczce ten akurat temat się nie pojawił, ale znajdziemy go na przykład na Skrzyneczce Gorta, (Winnipeg Art Gallery) albo na plakietkach z kości słoniowej, przechowywanych w Walters Art Museum w Baltimore i w British Museum w Londynie (Paryż, poł. XIV w.). Chodzi o scenę ukazującą Wergiliusza w koszu: poeta miał bowiem zakochać się w córce cesarza, a ona okrutnie z niego zadrwiła. Zaproponowała mu bowiem noc we dwoje w komnacie na szczycie wieży: poeta miał się tam dostać w koszu, wciągniętym przez okno przez cesarzównę. Niestety, w połowie drogi dziewczyna przestała ciągnąć za linę i Wergiliusz utknął: rankiem stał się obiektem drwin, gdy mieszkańcy Rzymu zobaczyli go wiszącego w koszu przy ścianie wieży. Wergiliusz jednak był czarnoksiężnikiem i poniewczasie przypomniał sobie o swoich mocach. Uciekłszy z Rzymu, rzucił na miasto klątwę, w wyniku której nikt z mieszkańców nie był w stanie zapalić ognia. Aby położyć kres tej katastrofie, Rzymianie postąpili zgodnie z wytycznymi urażonego Wergiliusza: sprowadzili na plac wredną cesarzównę i rozebrali ją do naga. Następnie odpalali świece i pochodnie od ognia, który w wyniku czarów rzuconych przez Wergiliusza wydobywał się z jej miejsc intymnych.

Dopełniające się sceny

Z pewnością zestawienie scen na poszczególnych bokach wspomnianych skrzyneczek nie jest kompilacją przypadkową. Jednocześnie, co ciekawe, zachowane do dziś przykłady pokazują nam, że artyści dekorowali te przedmioty według kilku nieznacznie różniących się schematów. I tak na przykład opowieść o Filis i Arystotelesie w niektórych przypadkach (np. na skrzyneczkach w Krakowie, Birmingham, Florencji, Nowym Jorku) została zestawiona z historią tragicznej miłości Pyrama i Tysbe, zaś na innych (w Londynie i Baltimore) z przedstawieniem Źródła Młodości, w którym kąpiel miała odwracać bieg czasu i cofać oznaki starzenia.

Skrzyneczka z kości słoniowej – detal (front: opowieść o Filis i Arystotelesie oraz Źródło Młodości),
Paryż, 2 ćw. XIV w., Walters Art Museum w Baltimore, 71.264


Analiza schematów dekoracji omawianych skrzyneczek pozwala wysnuć wniosek, że zestawiano na nich obok siebie sceny mające uzupełniać się znaczeniowo, najczęściej na zasadzie przeciwieństwa. Wygląda zatem na to, że historia o Arystotelesie mogła funkcjonować w kilku nieco odmiennych kontekstach. Zestawienie jej na niektórych skrzyneczkach z opowieścią o nieszczęśliwych kochankach, którzy popełnili samobójstwo w wyniku nieporozumienia (Pyram zabił się z rozpaczy, sądząc, że jego ukochaną pożarł lew, a następnie Tysbe, będąc świadkiem jego śmierci, odebrała sobie życie) prawdopodobnie miało na celu uwypuklenie kontrastu między miłością czystą i prawdziwą, silniejszą niż śmierć (Pyram i Tysbe), a lubieżnością, doprowadzającą ogarniętego pożądaniem mędrca do stanu zezwierzęcenia (Arystoteles i Filis). 

Tzw. skrzyneczka królowej Jadwigi – część frontalna (opowieść o Filis i Arystotelesie oraz historia Pyrama i Tysbe)


Tymczasem połączenie tej samej historii o Arystotelesie ze Źródłem Młodości koncentruje się już na innym aspekcie: to zestawienie starości i młodości w skontrastowanych ujęciach: pozytywnym (duchowym) oraz prześmiewczym (cielesnym). Z jednej strony widzimy starców, którzy odzyskują młodość, zanurzając się w cudownej fontannie – taka kąpiel mogła symbolizować oczyszczenie duszy z grzechów. Z drugiej zaś – mamy lubieżnego mędrca, który daje się ośmieszyć młodej kobiecie, ponieważ – niepomny na swój wiek i pozycję społeczną – zapragnął poczuć się niczym młody kochanek.

Starość ośmieszona

Dziś często mówimy, że żyjemy w kulturze młodości: komercyjne i rozrywkowe przekazy wizualne promują wzorzec pełnego energii, młodego człowieka sukcesu. Analiza tego zjawiska idzie czasami w parze z założeniem, że ów kult młodości jest charakterystyczny dla naszych czasów, podczas gdy w dawnych stuleciach wyżej ceniono mądrość i doświadczenie, które osiągnąć można jedynie z wiekiem. Jednak średniowieczna literatura pokazuje nam, że już wówczas wiek podeszły nie był wcale aż tak poważany, jak chcielibyśmy dziś sądzić. Starcy nader często występowali w ośmieszających opowieściach: jako niedołężni i często zdradzani przez młode żony. Bardzo wyrazistym przykładem negatywnego postrzegania starości w kulturze średniowiecznej może być trzynastowieczny poemat Powieść o Róży. W części pierwszej, którą Guillaume de Lorris napisał zapewne w latach 1225–30, bohater (Kochanek) dociera do otoczonego murem ogrodu; na ścianie zaś widnieją namalowane personifikacje wad. Obok Nienawiści, Chciwości czy Obłudy, znajduje się także Starość, traktowana jako jedna z przywar, które nie mają wstępu do ogrodu dwornej miłości.

Powieść o Róży, 2. ćw. XV w, Biblioteka Czartoryskich w Krakowie (Muzeum Narodowe w Krakowie), rękopis Ms. Czart. 2920 IV, s. 7 (Vieillesse – „Starość”) i s. 201 (Sicom la vieille enseigne belaccueil – „Jak Starucha poucza Sprzyjającego”)

W drugiej części poematu, którą w czterdzieści lat później dopisał Jean de Meun, pojawia się natomiast postać Staruchy, która jest doświadczoną kobietą, doradzającą młodym dziewczętom. Jej przemowa jest pełna cynizmu: stara kobieta jawi nam się jako wyrachowana, a jej rady wydają się zaskakująco niemoralne. Negatywny obraz starości w tym poemacie nie jest zatem krytyką samego podeszłego wieku, lecz raczej owego cynizmu, który wyrasta na bazie doświadczeń życiowych na przestrzeni lat. Starucha w Powieści o Róży daje młodym dziewczętom na przykład takie rady:

„Powtarzam więc, zalotnik zawsze
oszukać stara się niewiastę;
niechże i ona mu odpłaca
tą samą miarką i niech nigdy
serca jednemu nie oddaje,
lecz niech ma wokół siebie wielu
i tak się stara ich omotać,
aby się dla niej zrujnowali”.

I tak oto średniowieczna stara kobieta wychowuje kolejne pokolenie kobiet fatalnych…, które potem, być może, upokorzą następnych starych mężczyzn. A my, kilkaset lat później, będziemy mogli odkrywać te niepokojące aspekty ówczesnej kultury zaklęte w zachwycających arcydziełach paryskiego rzemiosła oraz średniowiecznej literatury.

W tekście został zacytowany fragment Powieści o Róży, wersy 13265–13272, w tłumaczeniu M. Frankowskiej-Terleckiej i T. Giermak-Zielińskiej, wyd. Warszawa 1997.

Opracowanie: dr Magdalena Łanuszka
Ten utwór jest dostępny na licencji Creative Commons Uznanie autorstwa 3.0 Polska.

dr Magdalena Łanuszka – absolwentka Uniwersytetu Jagiellońskiego w Krakowie, doktor historii sztuki, mediewistka. Ma na koncie współpracę z różnymi instytucjami: w zakresie dydaktyki (wykłady m.in. dla Uniwersytetu Jagiellońskiego, Akademii Dziedzictwa, licznych Uniwersytetów Trzeciego Wieku), pracy badawczej (m.in. dla University of Glasgow, Polskiej Akademii Umiejętności) oraz popularyzatorskiej (m.in. dla Archiwów Państwowych, Narodowego Instytutu Muzealnictwa i Ochrony Zbiorów, Biblioteki Narodowej, Radia Kraków, Tygodnika Powszechnego). W Międzynarodowym Centrum Kultury w Krakowie administruje serwisem Art and Heritage in Central Europe oraz prowadzi lokalną redakcję RIHA Journal. Autorka bloga o poszukiwaniu ciekawostek w sztuce: www.posztukiwania.pl.

less

Średniowieczna miłość cudzołożna

Skrzyneczka z kości słoniowej ze skarbca krakowskiej katedry należy do grupy zabytków wykonanych w Paryżu w 2. ćwierci XIV wieku – zabytki te dekorowane są scenami ze średniowiecznych romansów (zob. tekst Średniowieczne kobiety fatalne). Zestawienia poszczególnych epizodów uzupełniają się na zasadzie przeciwieństw: na przykład opowieści o miłości czystej zostały skontrastowane z legendami o cudzołóstwie. Szkopuł jednak w tym, że wiele średniowiecznych romansów jest tak skonstruowanych, że zamiast potępiać grzesznych kochanków, kibicujemy ich niemoralnemu związkowi.

more

Magdalena Łanuszka

Skrzyneczka z kości słoniowej ze skarbca krakowskiej katedry należy do grupy zabytków wykonanych w Paryżu w 2. ćwierci XIV wieku – zabytki te dekorowane są scenami ze średniowiecznych romansów (zob. tekst Średniowieczne kobiety fatalne). Zestawienia poszczególnych epizodów uzupełniają się na zasadzie przeciwieństw: na przykład opowieści o miłości czystej zostały skontrastowane z legendami o cudzołóstwie. Szkopuł jednak w tym, że wiele średniowiecznych romansów jest tak skonstruowanych, że zamiast potępiać grzesznych kochanków, kibicujemy ich niemoralnemu związkowi.

Tristan i Izolda

Legenda o Tristanie była bardzo popularna w średniowieczu: zachowało się kilka wersji opowieści, a zapewne krążyło ich więcej. Najstarsze teksty stanowiące podstawową opowieść są datowane na drugą połowę XII wieku, zaś późniejszy, trzynastowieczny Tristan prozą szerzej opisywał przygody bohatera, osadzając go zresztą wśród arturiańskich rycerzy Okrągłego Stołu. Scena w ogrodzie, występująca na skrzyneczkach z kości słoniowej, nie ilustruje wiernie opowieści zachowanych w przekazach tekstowych.

Tzw. skrzyneczka królowej Jadwigi – detal (krótszy bok lewy: fragment z Tristanem i Izoldą),
2. ćw. XIV w., Paryż, Skarbiec Katedry na Wawelu (Muzeum Katedralne w Krakowie).

Digitalizacja: Terramap Sp. z o.o., domena publiczna


Przedstawienia Tristana i Izoldy przy drzewie chyba nieprzypadkowo mogą się wizualnie kojarzyć z przedstawieniami Adama i Ewy w momencie popełnienia przez nich grzechu pierworodnego. Oto kochankowie spotkali się w ogrodzie, w odosobnieniu – śledził ich jednak mąż Izoldy, król Marek, który ukrył się na drzewie, aby podsłuchać ich rozmowę i dowiedzieć się, czy był zdradzany. Na szczęście los sprzyjał kochankom i zorientowali się oni, że są śledzeni. Scenka wyrzeźbiona w skrzyneczkach z kości słoniowej zawiera dwa przedstawienia głowy króla Marka: jedna widoczna jest na drzewie, a druga pod stopami Tristana i Izoldy. Owa druga głowa to tak naprawdę odbicie: twarz Marka, którą kochankowie ujrzeli w przepływającym pod drzewem strumyku. Oczywiście w tej sytuacji Tristan i Izolda – udając, że nie wiedzą o obecności króla – przeprowadzili niewinną rozmowę, w wyniku czego mąż Izoldy uznał, że plotki o ich romansie są jedynie pomówieniem.

Izolda trzyma w dłoniach małego pieska, symbol wierności (ale przecież nie jest to wierność małżeńska!). Tristan ma w dłoni sokoła, czyli bardzo popularny atrybut w przypadku przedstawień średniowiecznych kochanków.

Skrzyneczka z kości słoniowej – detal (lewy bok, fragment z Tristanem i Izoldą), Paryż, ok. 1310–30,
The Metropolitan Museum of Art w Nowym Jorku, 17.190.173a, b; 1988.16

Oznaki dziewictwa

Cudzołożna miłość Tristana i Izoldy miała być usprawiedliwiona przez fakt, że para ta niechcący wypiła miłosny napój – z tego powodu Izolda zakochała się nie w swoim przyszłym mężu, królu Marku, lecz w jego siostrzeńcu Tristanie, który eskortował ją do narzeczonego. Kochankowie skonsumowali swój związek, przez co Izolda miała problem ze swoją nocą poślubną: zależało jej na tym, aby król Marek sądził, że poślubił dziewicę. Ostatecznie honor Izoldy uratowała jej służka Brangien, która w czasie nocy poślubnej zastąpiła Izoldę w łożu króla Marka. W rzeczywistości jednak mało która średniowieczna dama miała służkę gotową oddać własne dziewictwo w imieniu swojej pani… a problem Izoldy najwyraźniej nie był oderwany od średniowiecznej rzeczywistości. Oto bowiem w ówczesnych traktatach medycznych i kosmetycznych znajdziemy także przepisy na odzyskiwanie oznak dziewictwa! Przykładowo, wśród dzieł wiązanych z jedenastowieczną lekarką Trotą z Salerno znajduje się księga zatytułowana De curis mulierum („O leczeniu kobiet”), która zawiera m. in. informacje, jak „zamarkować” dziewictwo za pomocą pijawki, przystawionej w odpowiednie miejsce przed nocą poślubną. Nawiasem mówiąc, traktat ten zawiera także przepisy na leczenie ust, popękanych od zbyt intensywnego całowania.

O ile jednak męża zawsze można jakoś zwieść, o tyle – wedle średniowiecznych legend – nie do oszukania w kwestii dziewictwa były jednorożce. Te mityczne stworzenia mogły być bowiem złapane tylko przez prawdziwą dziewicę, zwabione przez jej niewinność. W skrzyneczkach z kości słoniowej scena z Tristanem i Izoldą została zestawiona – na zasadzie kontrastu – właśnie z przedstawieniem polowania na jednorożca.

Skrzyneczka z kości słoniowej – detal (lewy bok: Tristan i Izolda oraz Polowanie na jednorożca),
Paryż, 2. ćw. XIV w., Walters Art Museum w Baltimore, 71.264

Lancelot i Ginewra

Trójkąt miłosny Tristana, Izoldy i Marka, w którym w zasadzie nie ma „dobrych” i „złych” bohaterów, stanowi powtórzenie trójkąta, który tworzyli Lancelot, królowa Ginewra i jej mąż, król Artur. Również przygody Lancelota, pozostające w związku z jego miłością do Ginewry, znalazły się wśród scen dekorujących skrzyneczki z kości słoniowej.

Sceny ukazane na skrzyneczkach ilustrują niezwykle popularne w średniowieczu opowieści o Lancelocie: w najstarszej wersji zachowane w tekstach  dwunastowiecznego poety Chrétiena de Troyes, stworzonych zapewne na zlecenie Marii hrabiny Szampanii, a spopularyzowane w utworze zwanym Lancelot prozą (tzw. Cykl Wulgaty), powstałym w pierwszej tercji XIII wieku. To właśnie w owej prozie (w niektórych wersjach utworu) znalazły się wzmianki o walce Lancelota z lwami, do czego może odnosić się jedna ze scen ze skrzyneczek. Głównym przedstawieniem jest jednak przejście Lancelota przez mieczowy most.

Tzw. skrzyneczka królowej Jadwigi – detal
(fragment tylnego boku: Walka z lwem oraz Lancelot na mieczowym moście)


Chrétien de Troyes opisał historię romansu Lancelota i Ginewry; zaczęła się ona od tego, że królowa została porwana przez złego Maleaganta, a Lancelot ruszył jej na ratunek. Właśnie w czasie tej wyprawy rycerz miał przeprawić się przez mieczowy most. Był tak skoncentrowany na swej misji uratowania królowej, że nie zauważył nawet poniesionych przy tej okazji ran. Miłość uczyniła z Lancelota najdoskonalszego z rycerzy – a jednak w opowieści Chrétiena znajdziemy także elementy krytycznej oceny tej relacji: dla królowej Lancelot akceptuje upokorzenia, a ona z kolei momentami traktuje go niemal okrutnie. Jednak ostatecznie nagrodą dla rycerza jest spędzenie nocy w łożu ukochanej. Niektóre fragmenty opowieści Chrétiena mają nawet charakter prześmiewczy (na przykład fakt, że zamyślony Lancelot wpadł do potoku, marząc o Ginewrze, albo że zemdlał na widok jej włosa zaplątanego w grzebień) – prawdopodobnie z tego względu, że autor nie chciał jednoznacznie gloryfikować miłości cudzołożnej, grzesznej.

W skrzyneczkach sceny z Lancelotem są zestawione z przygodą Gawaina, który uwolnił niewinne panny uwięzione w zamku, zabijając lwa oraz zwycięsko przechodząc próbę magicznego łoża, które atakowało go mieczami i pociskami. W odróżnieniu od Lancelota, Gawain nie realizował jednak swoich czynów po to, aby zdobyć serce i ciało cudzej żony.

Tzw. skrzyneczka królowej Jadwigi  – część tylna (po lewej: dwie sceny z Lancelotem, po prawej: dwie sceny z Gawainem)


Arturiańskie malowidła na piastowskim dworze

Uważa się, że skrzyneczka ze skarbca krakowskiej katedry mogła należeć do królowej Jadwigi Andegaweńskiej – niewątpliwie legendy arturiańskie były znane zarówno na dworach Piastów, jak i Jagiellonów. Znakomitym dowodem na to, a zarazem unikatowym zabytkiem, są dekoracje Wieży Książęcej w Siedlęcinie (woj. dolnośląskie) z 1. połowy XIV wieku. Fundatorem wieży i zdobiących ją malowideł był książę jaworsko-świdnicki Henryk I, którego żoną była Agnieszka Przemyślidka.

Dwa pasy dekoracji w Siedlęcinie ukazują właśnie przygody Lancelota: jego zwycięskie walki z różnymi przeciwnikami oraz epizod opowiadający o tym, że w cudowny sposób uzdrowił on Sir Urry’ego. Jednocześnie jednak górna część dekoracji w Siedlęcinie ukazuje początek grzesznego związku rycerza i królowej, którą uratował on z rąk Maleaganta. Ginewra i Lancelot zostali tu ukazani jako para trzymająca się za ręce; to gest pozornie małżeński, ale w tym przypadku jeden szczegół ma bardzo duże znaczenie: trzymają się oni za ręce lewe, a nie prawe! To dlatego, że ich związek ma charakter cudzołożny.

Malowidła w Wieży Książęcej w Siedlęcinie, lata 40. XIV w., fot. Pnapora. Po prawej detal: Lancelot i Ginewra, fot. Ludwig Schneider


Kobiety niewierne

Podobnie jak tekst o średniowiecznych kobietach fatalnych, także i niniejszy wpis można zamknąć cytatem z Powieści o Róży, trzynastowiecznego poematu alegorycznego dotyczącego głównie zagadnień związanych z miłością. Oto bowiem w przemowie starej kobiety, kierowanej do młodych dziewcząt, odnajdziemy czytelne przyzwolenie dla małżeńskiej niewierności – zwłaszcza w przypadku kobiet, którym Starucha doradza posiadanie nawet nie jednego, ale kilku kochanków jednocześnie:

„Kobiety rodzą się wolnymi,
lecz prawo wolność ogranicza,
tamę stawiając tym swobodom,
jakie Natura im nadała.
[…]
Wybaczyć trzeba więc Wenerze
to, że stworzeniom wolność niesie;
wybaczmy paniom, co figlują,
choć im małżeństwo tego wzbrania:
wszak one dążą do swobody,
do której skłania je Natura,
ta zaś nad wszystko jest silniejsza:
przewyższa nawet wychowanie”.

W innym zaś miejscu tego poematu pojawiają się rady dla pragnących spokoju w małżeństwie, z których wynika, że przepisem na szczęśliwe życie jest duża doza wyrozumiałości, którą mężczyzna powinien okazywać swojej ukochanej:

„Gdy na gorącym ją uczynku
przyłapie, niech jej nie wypędza,
raczej niech w stronę tę nie patrzy.
I niech udaje, że jest ślepy,
albo że głupszy jest od wołu,
tak, aby ona uwierzyła,
że nie mógł wprost nic zauważyć.
Gdy ona jakiś list otrzyma,
niech on do tego się nie wtrąca,
nie czyta, nawet nie dotyka,
sekretów poznać nie próbuje”.

 

Choć czytając arturiańskie romanse kibicujemy Tristanowi i Izoldzie czy nawet Lancelotowi i Ginewrze, to jednak nie możemy spodziewać się happy endu: ostatecznie niedole kochanków kończy śmierć. Być może gdyby król Artur oraz król Marek stosowali się do powyższych rad i z pełną godności rezygnacją przyjmowali do wiadomości niewierność swych żon, opisane w romansach historie miałyby nieco mniej tragiczne zakończenia.

W tekście zostały zacytowane fragmenty Powieści o Róży, w tłumaczeniu M. Frankowskiej-Terleckiej i T. Giermak-Zielińskiej, wyd. Warszawa 1997: wersy 13875–13878, 14031–14038, oraz 9696–9706.

Opracowanie: dr Magdalena Łanuszka
Ten utwór jest dostępny na licencji Creative Commons Uznanie autorstwa 3.0 Polska.

Czytaj też: Średniowieczne kobiety fatalne

dr Magdalena Łanuszka – absolwentka Uniwersytetu Jagiellońskiego w Krakowie, doktor historii sztuki, mediewistka. Ma na koncie współpracę z różnymi instytucjami: w zakresie dydaktyki (wykłady m.in. dla Uniwersytetu Jagiellońskiego, Akademii Dziedzictwa, licznych Uniwersytetów Trzeciego Wieku), pracy badawczej (m.in. dla University of Glasgow, Polskiej Akademii Umiejętności) oraz popularyzatorskiej (m.in. dla Archiwów Państwowych, Narodowego Instytutu Muzealnictwa i Ochrony Zbiorów, Biblioteki Narodowej, Radia Kraków, Tygodnika Powszechnego). W Międzynarodowym Centrum Kultury w Krakowie administruje serwisem Art and Heritage in Central Europe oraz prowadzi lokalną redakcję RIHA Journal. Autorka bloga o poszukiwaniu ciekawostek w sztuce: www.posztukiwania.pl.

less

Ivory casket decorated with scenes from chanson de geste

Pictures

Links

Game


Recent comments

Add comment: