MOCAK the Museum of Contemporary Art in Kraków is the first purpose-built museum in Poland devoted entirely to contemporary art. It opened in May 2011, on the site of the former Oskar Schindler factory. MOCAK’s main goals include presentation of the work of artists of the lasts two decades in the context of the postwar avant-garde and conceptualism and making art accessible to the public by highlighting its cognitive and ethical values and its links to everyday life. MOCAK projects are targeted at diverse groups of viewers. An important task for the institution is to reduce the existing  bias against recent art.
There are two permanent exhibitions at the Museum: the MOCAK Collection and Mieczysław Porębski’s Library; there are also temporary exhibitions that change four times a year. The MOCAK flagship is the annual exhibition organised each May, themed on the relationship between art and an important area of social life. To date, five presentations have appeared in the series: History in Art, Sport in Art, Economics in Art, Crime in Art and Gender in Art.
The MOCAK Collection presents some of the museum’s own collection, which now includes some 4 000 works by 207 artists.
In the MOCAK Archive we have the following collections: the Krzysztofory Gallery, the Artists’ Museum, Marian Eile, Władysław Hasior, Mieczysław Porębski and Mikołaj Smoczyński.
The programme of the Museum also comprises educational activities as well as research and publishing projects.

Elaborated by Museum of Contemporary Art in Kraków MOCAK, © all rights reserved

Photo: Rafał Sosin, © all rights reserved

www.mocak.pl

ul. Lipowa 4
30-702 Kraków


phone 12 263 40 00
page museum

Opening hours

Monday
closed
Tuesday  — Sunday
11.00 — 19.00

Ticket Prices

normal 14 PLN discount 7 PLN family ticket for groups of up to 5 ( including children under 6) 30 PLN normal group 10 PLN reduced group 5 PLN Tuesdays — admission free
Objects

Jadwiga Sawicka, “IMPIOUS / infamous”

From the mass of thickly laid off paint, there emerge words taken out of context and deliberately crooked. The clash between the background and the semantic content enhances the impact.

Katarzyna Górna, “Fuck me, Fuck you, Peace”

A photographic triptych, showing women in different stages of their lives – from youth, through maturity to old age. The adopted poses as well as the compositions with a static, altar-like quality point to the inspiration by Christian iconography, recurrent in the artist’s work. The work deals with the relationship between age and the attitude to life. A young woman wants to be loved, a mature woman is fed up with everything and the old woman craves peace.

Laura Pawela, “we.jpg 17%”

The convention of computer commands and terms transferred to an existential area. A clash of computer language with real-world problems. An amusing, but at the same time unpleasant, discrepancy between the two worlds.

Pola Dwurnik, “Mercy!”

Twenty four colour self-portraits stand out from the crowd sketched in the background; each face plays out the spectacle of a different personality.

Bartek Materka, untitled [“Skeletons”]

Reconstruction of an open grave. By the manner of painting, the artist has emphasised the emotive quality of the represention of a post mortem.

Sarah Lucas, “Sucky Thing 2011”

The work is one of a series of sculptures made from tights filled with down. The material used and the soft shapes achieved connote the female. Simultaneously, however the biological shape placed on a lavatory, reminiscent of faeces, triggers revulsion.

Csaba Nemes, “Far from the Sea”

Józsefváros, the Budapest district no. 8 still carries the marks of having been bombed during World War II and the Hungarian Uprising of 1956. The buildings which are no longer there are conspicuous for their absence. For Nemes, these void spaces are more authentic than the buildings which are there, because their appearance has not changed in half a century. The levitating residents are a metaphor for all his compatriots – distrustful, introverted, alienated.

Teresa Murak, “Third Crop”

The work visualises the process of growth, maturing and decay. Simultaneously, it carries a natural association with the traditional Polish Easter custom of growing from seed water cress, which thus becomes a symbol of new life. The work is also permeated with the longing to be at one with nature, also present in the artist’s other works.

Zofia Kulik, “All the Missiles Are One Missile”

Photomontage using combination print. The composition is made through repeated imprinting of one or more negatives on an appropriately masked paper. Zofia Kulik’s collages are complex visual texts. Each carries a message that has been carefully devised and executed.

Daniel Spoerri, “The Seville Series No. 16”

Immortalisation of a supper through mounting crockery, cutlery and preserved leftovers of the food. The resultant composition is supposed to be exhibited vertically. To present a table at such an angle introduces a gravitational disturbance.

Edward Dwurnik, “Hunting a Dangerous Villain”

The painting was a response to Martial Law in Poland. It shows an imaginary city, which – as is the case with the majority of Dwurnik’s paintings – we view from above. At first glance, everything seems tranquil, stable and safe. Only a searching examination reveals the drama of a city taken over by the army.

Group AES+F, “Défilé #1”

The AES+F group shows dead bodies dressed in ballroom finery. The dramatic content is emphasised by using f life-size photographs, made all the more realistic by being displayed in lightboxes. The human fear of passing away is hidden behind obsessive adornment of the body. Death is presented in its “luxury” version which, despite all efforts, only serves to emphasize the deadness of the corpse. The series Défilé consists of 7 photographs in lightboxes. Film with the photographic prints has been glued to Plexi and placed in aluminium boxes, lit from behind.

Group AES+F, “Défilé #4”

The AES+F group shows dead bodies dressed in ballroom finery. The dramatic content is emphasised by using life-size photographs, made all the more realistic by being displayed in lightboxes. The human fear of passing away is hidden behind obsessive adornment of the body. Death is presented in its “luxury” version which, despite all efforts, only serves to emphasize the deadness of the corpse. The series Défilé consists of 7 photographs in lightboxes. Film with the photographic prints has been glued to Plexi and placed in aluminium boxes, lit from behind.

Group AES+F, “Défilé #5”

The AES+F group shows dead bodies dressed in ballroom finery. The dramatic content is emphasised by using f life-size photographs, made all the more realistic by being displayed in lightboxes. The human fear of passing away is hidden behind obsessive adornment of the body. Death is presented in its “luxury” version which, despite all efforts, only serves to emphasize the deadness of the corpse. The series Défilé consists of 7 photographs in lightboxes. Film with the photographic prints has been glued to Plexi and placed in aluminium boxes, lit from behind.

Group AES+F, “Défilé #6”

The AES+F group shows dead bodies dressed in ballroom finery. The dramatic content is emphasised by using f life-size photographs, made all the more realistic by being displayed in lightboxes. The human fear of passing away is hidden behind obsessive adornment of the body. Death is presented in its “luxury” version which, despite all efforts, only serves to emphasize the deadness of the corpse. The series Défilé consists of 7 photographs in lightboxes. Film with the photographic prints has been glued to Plexi and placed in aluminium boxes, lit from behind.

Jarosław Kozłowski, “Counting-Out Rhyme”

Fifteen bowls of dried-up paint each have a matching cloth on which someone has wiped their dirty hands. Each such soiling/cleaning set is ascribed to a site of genocide. Washing hands is a symbolic act of removing oneself from these events and thereby from any responsibility. However, the material testimony remains.

Jerzy Bereś, “Rag”

The offered hand invites a handshake. However, its extension is a dirty flag with the inscription Rag. We must decide whether we shall respond in kind to the seemingly friendly gesture, or whether we shall openly reject it. The work is a commentary on the epoch of the People's Republic of Poland.

Krištof Kintera, “All My Bad Thoughts”

Visualization of the Spiritual State. It is difficult to convey depression because of the lack of words, and the available expressions are banal to the point of ennui. A painting turns out to be a more capacious and sensitive medium than words or poetry. The “black secretion of the soul” is poured over a reclining figure.

KwieKulik, “Actions with a Tube”

The series of photographs is a record of one of numerous actions that the two artists carried out in their own flat. It took place in August 1975, with the participation of Przemysław Kwiek’s sister Zofia Kulik and the artists’ son – Maksymilian Dobromierz. A cardboard tube was the centre of the action. It had been made to order as an advertising prop; after the action it went to the client.

Piotr Lutyński, “Due to Usucaption”

One of Lutyński’s works using the motif of a nest and an egg – a symbol of birth, of new life, a beginning and a sense of security. A witty attempt to combine usucaption and brooding.