A visit to the Museum is like taking a journey into the past of the Free Royal Town of Piwniczna-Zdrój. Historic collections including photographs and reproductions of archival documents allow one to get to know the history of the town from its foundation by Casimir the Great in the mid-14th century, through to the Old Poland era, to the discovery of the healing properties of the local mineral waters in the 19th century, up to the World War II period. The exhibition is complemented by a display of local art – paintings, reliefs, and photographs by local artists. In the museum there is also a unique collection of skis and ski equipment, which was donated to the Museum by Professor Zbigniew Bielczyk.
In the ethnographic section of the Museum, visitors can see various household objects, tools and outfits belonging to the inhabitants of the local lands, the so-called Czarni Górale (Black Highlanders). The Czarni Górale made each of the presented objects by themselves; many of them are minor works of art, for example, a vice with the carved head of an animal.

Elaborated by Julia Czapla, Joanna Kotarba,
Licencja Creative Commons

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Poland License.

Photograph by Marek Antoniusz Święch, arch. MIK (2014),
Licencja Creative Commons

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Poland License.

www.turystyka.piwniczna.pl

ul. Rynek 11,
33-350 Piwniczna Zdrój


phone 18 446 44 33
page museum

Opening hours

Monday
closed
Tuesday
10.00 — 16.00
Wednesday
9.00 — 15.00
Thursday
12.00 — 17.00
Friday
9.00 — 14.00
Saturday
9.00 — 13.00
Sunday
8.00 — 13.00

Ticket Prices

normal 5 PLN
reduced 3 PLN
Objects

Siberian ski

It is worth paying attention to the unusual shape of the ski. Its width and length (204 cm), as well as the square-cut back, indicate that it is a type intermediate between the arctic and southern ski. It comes from the western part of the USSR. What is also interesting, is the hole in the front of the ski, which allows for a string to be threaded through it, in order to pull the ski behind, while supporting oneself with a pole if need be.

Siberian birch ski

It is worth noting the characteristic shape (side carving) and the material — birch wood — which is exceptionally light, but, due to its lack of durability, was used very rarely for the production of skis; ash wood, beech wood, or — in special cases — hickory wood was usually used instead.

Mountain ski from Norway

Normal 0 21 false false false PL X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:Standardowy; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman","serif"; border:none;} The exhibited type of ski was introduced by Norwegians as a mountain ski. Its dimensions—length, the width of the tip in the middle and in the tail—indicate that it is a “telemark” type. The ski has a bowed tip and is bent under the foot, but lacks a groove (its absence is characteristic of mountain skis). The Norwegian binding, made of reed—which was used in the late nineteenth century—is also noteworthy.

“Telemark” ski from the end of 19th century

Normal 0 21 false false false PL X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:Standardowy; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman","serif"; border:none;} The telemark ski, with the Huitfeld “B” binding, was probably made in Berlin. In the upper part of the skis, there are visible traces of previous reed bindings.

Adam Małysz ski

Normal 0 21 false false false PL X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:Standardowy; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman","serif"; border:none;} A Fischer ski jumping ski without binding. The traces of the screws, with which the bindings were fixed, start 60 cm from the heel (in total, they appear over a 42 cm section). The upper side of the ski features the handwritten inscription: “For the Museum Chamber in Piwniczna Małysz Adam”.

Jumping ski

The history of ski jumping in Poland dates back to the early 20th century. The first world records were beaten by Sondre Norheim from Norway (30.5 m in 1860). These days, jumps have lengths of more than 240 metres (Adam Małysz has jumped 225 m; in the 2012/2013 season, Piotr Żyła and Kamil Stoch reached lengths of 232.5 m).

Mountain ski from Scandinavia

Normal 0 21 false false false PL X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:Standardowy; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman","serif"; border:none;} A characteristic feature of the northern skis—used in the Scandinavian Peninsula and in Finland—was the disproportion in the length of two skis in one pair: one was longer (the one exhibited in the collection of Małopolska’s Virtual Museums measures 260 cm) and is additionally equipped with a sliding groove; the other, shorter one was used for pushing off (in the case of the present exhibit, the other ski has not survived).

“Telemark” ski from 1919

A characteristic feature of telemark skiing was the release of the foot: the shoe was attached to the ski only with the tips of the toes. The ski — which is in the collection of the Małopolska’s Virtual Museums — is a special type of telemark ski, because of the innovation that the creator of a new type of binding, Bilgeri...

Recent comments

Add comment: