The Municipal Engineering Museum presents the major achievements of Polish technology. Antique cars and motorcycles, historic tram cars, typewriters … and all this in the buildings of the oldest tram depot in Kraków. The technological monuments collected in the Museum present the history of the Polish automotive industry and the Kraków printing industry during the period between the 15th and the 20th centuries, the development of historic TV and radio sets as well as the history of the gas industry and power plants.
The exhibition The History of Polish Motorised Transport presents more than 30 Polish cars and motorcycles, including the Syrena and the Warszawa manufactured by the Żerań factory. The most distinguished technical achievements in the Museum collection include: a Braille typewriter from 1899, the first Polish TV set from 1955 and “Smyk” — an unrealised microcar prototype from 1957. Both children and adults can enjoy the interactive exhibition Around the Wheel at which one can learn about the many applications of a wheel.

Elaborated by Julia Czapla, Joanna Kotarba,
Licencja Creative Commons

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Poland License.

Photograph by Marek Antoniusz Święch, arch. MIK (2013),
Licencja Creative Commons

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Poland License.

www.mimk.com.pl/en

ul. Św. Wawrzyńca 15,
31-060 Kraków


phone 12 428 66 00
Fax 12 428 66 00
page museum

Opening hours

Monday
closed
Tuesday  — Thursday
9.00 — 16.00
Friday
9.00 — 18.00
Saturday  — Sunday
10.00 — 18.00

Ticket Prices

normal 15 PLN reduced 10 PLN family 40 PLN
Tuesday — free admission to permanent exhibitions
Objects

“Brunsviga 13” calculating machine

Brunsviga 13 is a manual mechanical calculating machine (arithmometer) with a 13-position counter. Arithmometers were patented in the 19th century in France and were designed to perform addition and subtraction, whereas multiplication and division could be conducted by several operations of adding and subtracting. They were driven manually (with a crank or a lever).

The Marconi radio set — 4-LS/I model (serial number 7163)

The Marconi radio set is a high quality luxury battery-operated radio set produced by Polskie Zakłady Marconi S.A. This Warsaw branch of the Marconi Wireless Telegraph Company Ltd. London, the company established by the undisputed inventor of radiophony, Guglielmo Marconi, was established in 1928.

Philips 7-39 radio (serial number 1549)

This 7–39 radio set was produced by Polskie Zakłady Philips in the penultimate season of its production (1938/39) that was interrupted by the outbreak of World War II. Polskie Zakłady Philips was the largest radio manufacturing plant in Poland between World War I and World War II. It was established by a Dutch company of Philips in 1922 as Polsko–Holenderska Fabryka Lampek Elektrycznych S.A. (The Polish-Dutch Plant of Electric Lamps). It was renamed to Philips in 1928.

HRO receiver – HRO Senior model

National HRO Senior is an American shortwave receiver, used both in civilian and military radio-communication service. The HRO was made in 1934 for the National Radio Company in the USA. The receivers were produced in many versions: HRO Senior (prod. 1935–1943), HRO-Jr (prod. 1936–1943), RAS (prod. 1939–1945), HRO-M and HRO–5 (prod. 1944–1945).

Radio Elektrit Majestic (serial number 7578)

The Majestic radio receiver is an example of the production of one of the largest pre-war Polish radio companies — Towarzystwo Radiotechniczne Elektrit. This model was awarded the gold medal at the Radio Exhibition in Paris in 1936. Little wonder that a press advertisement from the 1930s described it as “the receiver for the most demanding”.

Black and white “Belweder” — OT 1782 TV set

Following the Wisła TV set, the black and white Belweder TV set was the second TV set to be produced in Poland and the first one entirely designed in our country. Laboratory works commenced in 1955 with the assumption that its production would be based on technologies available in Poland, on the contrary the Wisła TV set was produced on the basis of Soviet license and parts.

Mikiphone pocket phonograph

The phonograph has a spring drive mechanism and is designed to play discs that have a diameter of 10 to 25 cm at 33 rpm. It is sometimes described as the walkman of the Victorian era and the great-grandfather of the iPod. It is an example of one of the first pocket-size and movable devices for playing music.

Small typewriter FK (“efka”)

It is a small, movable typewriter, one of the most classic typewriters of the 1st half of the 20th century. Its production, on the basis of the patent purchased from the Paillard company of Switzerland, was commenced by Fabryka Karabinów (FK) [Warsaw Rifle Factory] in 1938.

Typewriter “Columbia Bar-Lock”

The Bar-Lock typewriter is a patented design by the inventor and lawyer Charles Spiro in 1888. The presented model 10, was produced from 1900, under the brand Columbia Bar-Lock (in the United States) and Royal Bar-Lock in the British market. The keyboard used in the presented model is full, provided with 78 typing keys and one function key. The keyboard, constructed in this way, was adapted to English characters. For the needs of the non-English market, machines were produced with a set of 86 keys and only under the Royal Bar-Lock brand.

Typewriter “Hammond”

James Hammond obtained a patent for the construction of the machine in 1881, and its serial production began in 1884. The presented model 12 was created in the early 20th century in two versions; one was characterized by an arched two-row keyboard, typical of the early Hammonds; and the second, with a three-row keyboard, was typical for three-register machines. The final version, seen in the presented object, was introduced at the end of the nineteenth century along with the growing competition of lever-typing machines, with a typical arrangement of keys in straight rows.

Typewriter “Picht”

The “Picht” machine is a Braille typewriter adapted for the blind, invented by Oskar Picht in 1899. Its production began three years later. The first single copies of typewriters for the blind had beene created earlier (since the 18th century), but they allowed correspondence only with the sighted. The development of the journal for the blind by Louis Braille in 1825, disseminated in the 2nd half of the 19th century, created new opportunities that were used by the inventor—and later the director ꟷ of the centre for the blind in Bydgoszcz, Oskar Picht.

Osa M50 scooter

The Osa M50 and M52 scooters are the only Polish mopeds designed for batch production. Works on the design and production of the Polish scooter started in the Progress and Sports Department of the Warsaw Motorcycle Factory (WFM — Warszawska Fabryka Motocykli) by engineers Krzysztof Brun, Jerzy Jankowski and Tadeusz Mathia in 1951. From the group of discussed designs based on already manufactured elements of motorcycles that were produced in Poland, the OSA model was eventually selected.

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