The Ethnographic Museum in Kraków was established on a basis of passion and respect for peasant culture, European cultures and the cultures of distant continents. It is a striking feature of this oldest and greatest ethnographic collection in Poland.
Apart from objects from the past and present areas of Poland (relics of folklore, craft, handicraft, wooden constructions, folk art), the Museum collection also contains unique items from other European and non-European countries.
The museum was established in 1911 thanks to the efforts of  Seweryn Udziela, a teacher, amateur ethnographer and collector. For the ethnographic museum, he envisaged a research workshop where one could “sit down to work and study the history as well as the current condition of the nations’ culture” (1904). Today, more than one hundred years after its establishment, the museum keeps pursuing the same goal: to document and interpret contemporary lifestyles.
By organising exhibitions, publications, workshops and research projects, the Ethnographic Museum in Kraków creates a space for and encourages discussion and debate. This is further achieved through the use of experiments and innovations. The Museum presents cultural information for our personal reflection, thus bringing into awareness their very existence. It also allows us to compare our current lifestyles to past ones.

Elaborated by The Seweryn Udziela Ethnographic Museum in Kraków, © all rights reserved

Photograph by Marek Antoniusz Święch, arch. MIK (2012),
Licencja Creative Commons

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Poland License.

www.etnomuzeum.eu

ul. Krakowska 46,
31-066 Kraków


phone 12 430 60 23
Fax 12 430 63 30
phone 12 430 55 75 (Ratusz)
phone 12 430 63 42 (Dom Esterki)
page museum

Opening hours

Monday
closed
Tuesday  — Sunday
10.00 — 19.00

Ticket Prices

normal 13 PLN reduced 7 PLN normal group 10 PLN reduced group 5 PLN family 20 PLN Sunday — free admission to permanent exhibitions

'Celender' felt hat for the Kraków costume

A hat belonging to the Kraków costume, so-called celender, made from black felt. Its shape resembles a cylinder slightly narrowing towards the top and with a 5 cm wide brim. The hat has a decoration in the form of a black tape of a lining material, which is an imitation of a velvet ribbon, and which has been fastened together at the front with a large brass buckle. On the tape, at the brim of the hat, there is a narrow ribbon embroidered with floral patterns.

Wedding scarf from Raciborowice

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Women's shoes with uppers from Mników

Women's calf-length boots made from black leather from the Krakow costume are an example of Hungarian style boots. These are the oldest type of boots, which were characterised by stitching two pieces of leather together on the sides. The upper layers of the boots are stiffened at the top, and in the lower part the skin is characteristically concertinaed (“bellows”).

Apron for Kraków costume

An apron of white thin cotton cloth for the festive Kraków costume, full so as to cover the front and sides of a skirt, made from two widths of material, pleated, sewn into a narrow trim with cords formed on it. The apron is richly decorated with hand-made white punch and openwork pull out (toledo) embroidery, with a satin stitch.

Black woollen skirt for an old type of Bronowice costume

A woollen skirt machine-sewn from six gores of fabric, creased in its upper part. A small black tape sewn over the creasing changes into fastening strips at some point. The bottom part of the skirt is lined with a strip of patterned cotton fabric; the edge is finished with a blue trimmed tape.

Womens’s corset for Kraków costume

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Women's shirt for Bronowice costume

A women's blouse for the Kraków costume made of white cotton, decorated with handmade embroidery white, hole and satin stitch. Cut with yoke, without a collar. In the middle of the front, a slit about 27 cm long, fastened under the neck with a button. Long sleeves, gathered at the top, finished with embroidered cuffs.

Wedding scarf for Kraków costume

A White headscarf tied into a bonnet for the Kraków costume, decorated with flat and punch embroidery. Two sides of the scarf are cut in an openwork teeth style with small holes, the other two sides are more richly decorated. Above the openwork teeth there is a frieze composed of hemstitched and punched cone motifs. Moreover, in the spaces between the cones, there are six-petal punched flowers and embroidered small branches with leaves.

Women's shoes hungarian style for Kraków costume

A pair of women's boots in a Hungarian style for the Kraków costume, made of black tanned leather, stiffened inside with pale cow skin. These boots have two-piece uppers stitched on the sides and stiffened at the top; in the lower part, at the ankles, the skin is characteristically concertinaed (“bellows”).

White woollen apron

An apron to match the Kraków costume made of two gores of white thin woollen fabric with motifs of green twigs, roses and other pink and red flowers, and blue and pink tiny flowers and buds printed over it.

Green woollen skirt

A skirt for a Kraków-style costume sewn from six green woollen fabric gores with pink-crimson-white motifs of single roses and yellow-claret ribbons. By means of delicate green stems, the roses are bunched together with blue flowers – rosettes with five petals separated from each other with small yellow circles.

Velvet corset for Kraków costume

A woman's corset for the Kraków costume from Bronowice, made of velvet, composed of two front parts, and with a flounce sewn on to it on the back, laid in thirteen folds. The front is fastened with hooks and eyes. It has a white lining and is decorated with haberdashery bands of metal gold and silver threads, and decorative buttons, beads, and sequins.

Women's shirt for Kraków costume

Kraków costume women's shirt made from white fabric, decorated with white embroidery.

Men's shirt collar stud

In the 19th century, jewellery was worn with folk costumes both by women and men who tied a red ribbon around the shirt collar or fastened the sides of the collar with a collar stud. It was usually made of an alloy of lead, zinc and nickel (bakfon — a material made of imitation silver). The collar stud was adorned with a bead, although few men could afford real coral beads, artificial or even bread beads were used much more often.

Men's shoes for Kraków costume

Men's calf-length boots for the Kraków costume, made of black Russian leather. The main stitch is at the back of the boot. The boots have an isolated vamp, counters and a two-piece upper. The upper is stiffened at the top and lined with leather, at the bottom it is soft and lined with linen.

Men' tunic for Bronowice Costume

A man's kaftan without a collar and sleeves, sewn by hand and made of deep dark blue factory cloth. On the back, below the waist, there are three slits dividing the kaftan's bottom into four laps, the so-called gills. The lining and trimming are made of red cloth. On the front, the pockets are covered with pentagonal lapels.

White sukmana coat — Bronowice costume

A men's sukmana coat with a mandarin collar, made of white cloth. The sleeves are finished with small trapezoid lapels, with two oblique pocket holes on the front, fastened with a brass hook and eye. The collar, sleeve lapels, and a slit on the front are lined with red cloth; the edges are finished with a red trim. The sukmana coat is adorned with amaranthine silk cord appliqués and similar motifs of thread bundles embroidered with silken threads.

Ceramic tile “Maryna's discipline”

Ceramic corner tile taken from a clay stove, the so-called heater. It was made by the pottery workshop of Jan Oksitowicz, a potter enrolled in the Kraków guild in 1832. The tile comes from a stove which existed even in the interwar period in one of the Kraków tenement houses belonging to the Tarnowski family. After World War II, the stove stood in the former residence of this family in Dzików near Tarnobrzeg, from where, dismantled, it found its way to Kraków again.

Wooden snuffbox

A container in the shape of a human hand clenched into a fist, intended for storing snuff. It is made of oak, with a rectangular hollowed-out interior, covered with a thin lid. The plate of the lid is mounted on the wrist part with a leather hinge. It is finished with a ledge, which was used to raise the lid with a fingernail. The snuffbox is finished with dark brown French polish.

Kraków Bronowice cottage

The model was made in 1901 by Bronowice carpenters under the supervision of Włodzimierz Tetmajer and with the participation of a painter, Antoni Procajłowicz. The piece was commissioned by Jerzy Warchałowski on the occasion of the First Exhibition of the Polish Applied Arts Society in Kraków.

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