A visit to the Kraków Archaeological Museum is a unique opportunity to go
back in time to the world of prehistoric Małopolska. The museum focuses
on the ancient history of the present Małopolska Province and depicts the
types of conditions in which our ancestors lived. It looks at the different
methods used to gather food throughout the period from ancient times to
the Middle Ages and demonstrates what the ancient people of Małopolska
looked like (what clothes they wore, how they lived, how they decorated
their outfits and what weapons they used).
Apart from Polish collections, the Museum houses some exhibits from other
parts of the world: Egypt, Asia Minor and Peru. The exhibition Gods of
Ancient Egypt presents monuments from the one of the greatest ancient
centres of culture. The most valuable exhibits include sarcophagi from El-
Gamhud and an extensive collection ofjewellery and figures depicting
Egyptian gods. The Museum's collection also houses the contents of the
tomb of the Scythian princess(dating back to the 3rd century B.C.) which
contains various vessels, golden fragments of the princess's outfit and her
jewellery.

Elaborated by Olga Kasztelewicz, Joanna Kotarba,
Licencja Creative Commons

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Poland License.

Photograph by Marek Antoniusz Święch, arch. MIK (2012),
Licencja Creative Commons

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Poland License.

www.ma.krakow.pl

 

ul. Senacka 3,
31-002 Kraków


phone 12 422 71 00
phone 12 422 75 60
Fax 12 422 77 61
page museum

Opening hours

January  — June
Monday
9.00 — 15.00
Tuesday
9.00 — 18.00
Wednesday
9.00 — 15.00
Thursday
9.00 — 18.00
Friday
9.00 — 15.00
Saturday
closed
Sunday
11.00 — 16.00
July  — August
Monday  — Friday
10.00 — 17.00
Saturday
closed
Sunday
10.00 — 15.00
September  — December
Monday
9.00 — 15.00
Tuesday
9.00 — 18.00
Wednesday
9.00 — 15.00
Thursday
9.00 — 18.00
Friday
9.00 — 15.00
Saturday
closed
Sunday
11.00 — 16.00

Ticket Prices

The Main Building regular pass 12 PLN reduced pass 7 PLN The Main Building — permanent exhibitions normal 10 PLN reduced 6 PLN The Main Building — temporary exhibitions normal 8 PLN reduced 5 PLN The underground exhibition normal 4 PLN reduced 3 PLN Garden 2 PLN
Sunday — free admission

Corinthian capital

The exhibit comes from the collection of the Field Museum No. 2 established by Polish soldiers who fought in Egypt during the WW II. The creator and spiritus movens of this unique project was Jarosław Sagan. The head, with relatively shallow sculpting is a simplified form of a Corinthian capital. It could have been based on classical extended examples from Byzantine architecture. It consists of two zones, with the lower row made in a shallow relief resembling stylised acanthus. The leaves in the upper row, which are carved deeper in marble, spread towards four edges under the rectangular abacus.

A sword from Small Market in Kraków

The iron sword from the Mały Rynek [Small Market] Square in Kraków was discovered during the renovation of the square’s surface in 2007. So far, it is the only sword found in the archaeological research in the area of Kraków.

“Princely” grave from Jakuszowice near Kazimierza Wielka

The find is dated back to the 1st half of the 5th century (before 434). It is one of the most interesting pieces of proof of contact between the peoples inhabiting the area of southern Poland and the Huns in the 1st half of the 5th century. The grave was discovered by accident in 1911 while mining sand. The majority of the excavated objects were smuggled to Kraków over the then Russian-Austrian border.

Vessel with an artistic representation of symplegma

A man and a woman in an erotic scene are shown on the chest which imitates a bed. Both figures are naked, with their long hair reaching down to their shoulders with strongly marked eyes, noses and half-open mouths. The stirrup-shaped ear connects the back of the man with the side-surface of the bed, which is covered with a geometric ornament.

Vessel in the shape of a warrior’s head

The vessel comes from the collection of Władysław Kluger from 1876. It has the shape of a warrior’s head with a band. On its sides there are large protruding ears with earrings. The eyes of the warrior are almond-like, with slightly hooded eyelids. The face is of a geometrised shape.

Ushabti figures

The ushabti figures — artistically perfect and finely made — were purchased from the Museum of Egyptian Antiquities in Cairo by soldiers of the Polish Independent Carpathian Rifle Brigade during WW II and subsequently granted to the Archaeological Museum. The pillar at the back of the figure reaches the lower edge of a tripartite wig, finely fashioned in regular wisps exposing the ears.

Tomb stele from Ginari Tafah

The sculpture was purchased in Cairo by soldiers of the Polish Independent Carpathian Rifle Brigade during WW II. The stele comes from the Christian site in Lower Nubia (present day Egypt) in Ginari Tafah. The tombstone is topped with an imitation of a conch. Traces of dark red paint on the tombstone indicate that it must have been painted originally. The epitaph begins with the formula declaring the death of the person called Elisabeth.

The hoard with iron axe-like bars (“grzywna”) from 13 Kanonicza Street in Kraków

This treasure was found during rescue investigations in the basements of the backyard annex at 13 Kanonicza Street in Kraków in 1979. The deposit fell under the core of the early medieval bank of Okol. It was hidden in a pit measuring 108 x 210 cm, at a depth of about 100 cm, under walls partially covered with oak and fir wood...

Stele of the son of Chairemon and Isidora from Kom Abou Billou

The stele was purchased in Cairo at Eli Albert and Joseph Abermayor by soldiers of the Polish Independent Carpathian Rifle Brigade during WW II. The scene depicts a deceased man lying on a klinai and a female orant standing opposite. The man lying in the bed is dressed in a short-sleeved chiton and a himation rolled at the waist, wrapped around his left hand. In his right, outstretched hand he is holding a kantharos. The woman standing in front of him is depicted en face, she is dressed in the same way as the man and is raising her hands in a gesture of prayer. Under the scene an inscription is placed. The name of the deceased has been preserved only partially; perhaps it was Sosas. The name of his father was Chairemon; the name of Isidora is also there, popular in Egypt in the Roman period. The figures are bound together by family ties.

Stela of man from Kom Abou Billou

On the preserved bottom half of the relief the deceased is shown reclining on a kline with mattress, supported on two pillows. He is dressed in a chiton and himation, with right leg in profile, left shown frontally. The funerary repast is suggested by two sheaves of corn and an amphora in between, next to which stands a three-legged table with horizontal bar.

Silver cup from Ryzhanivka

This mug was part of the tomb gifts of the ‘princess’ from Ryzhanovka. It rested in a bronze situla, which probably contributed to the fact that it was in perfect condition. The entire vessel is carved out of one piece of metal. The ornament consists of vertical forged stripes, centred around...

Sculpture of man and woman

Sculpture comes from the excavations conducted by Hermann Junker in 1913 in the eastern sector of the Great Western Necropolis, west of the pyramid of Cheops. The sculpture shows the figures in a specific canon: the man in the form of moving and a woman standing with folded feet.

Red-figure pelike

The clay red-figure vessel comes from Kerch — a Greek colony situated on the Black Sea. It was made in the so-called Kerch style and is dated back to the 4th century BC. The edge of the vessel is trimmed with an ornament of an egg-and-dart encircling the figural scene. On the one side there is Arimaspian fighting with a gryphon. The warrior is dressed in a tunic and trousers — anaxyrides.

Mummy of a falcon

Mummy was carefully wrapped in resinated bandage, the crossing bands created geometrical pattern. In the upper part it is formed to resemble the head of a falcon with all the essential details being marked on it. X-ray made of the mummy have revealed no mummified remains under the bandages; inside are the bones of an animal. The falcon's skeleton being mixed with, as paleontologist have discovered, the bones of a frog and lizard, presumably the bird's last meal.

Mummy of a cat

Mummy was carefully wrapped in resinated bandage, the crossing bands created a geometrical pattern. The upper part was formed to resemble the head of a cat with all details being marked on it. X-ray made of the mummy have revealed no mummified remains under the bandages; inside are bones of an animal. In order to provide stiffness the cat's skeleton was stiffed by a stick. Animals were mummified in Egypt for different reasons. A haunch from an ox or some other animal, dipped in salt and wrapped in bandages, was put in a wooden coffin of appropriate shape to serve as food for the deceased in the Netherworld. Mummified pets – monkeys, dogs, even gazelles and ducks – were placed inside the funerary chamber, sometimes inside the coffin with their dead owner.

Head of a ruler from Saqqara

Features of style, like treatment of the eyes, uraeus form and the soft outline of the nemes permit attribution to Ptolemaic times. Based on similarities with the head of a sphinx of 150 BC, it is possible to assume that our head had once belonged to a sphinx set up at Saqqara, if the place of discovery is anything to go by.

Head of a ruler

The head is a fragment of the ruler's statue, it is covered with nemes [scarf] with a wide head-band over the forehead, decorated with the insignia of the Pharaonic power uraeus [cobra]. It is a face with faded features; the eyes are shown without detail; it has a wide nose with distended nostrils.

Greek ostrakon – receipt of tax payment in cash

Receipt of tax payment in cash. Date: November 5, AD 108. “Bokchoris son of Iosepos, [as] payment of k... tax for the 12th year [of the reign] of Trajan, our lord. Year 12, Hathyr 9.” Commentary: Iosepos is a variant of the name of Josephus. The name of the tax is preserved but illegible.

Greek ostrakon – receipt of payment of the Jewish tax

In AD 72, after suppressing the Jewish uprising in Palestine, the Romans levied a Jewish tax (ioudaikon telesma) on all Jews living in the Roman Empire. It exceeded 8 drachmas and was a considerable burden on the mostly poor residents of the Jewish district in Apollinopolis Magna. This document is a receipt for only part of the yearly burden.

Greek ostrakon – receipt of payment of the “merismos” tax

Receipt of payment of the merismos tax. Date: April 21, AD 113. “Nikias son of Pasion, for merismos for the 16th year [of the reign] of Trajan, our lord, 4 drachmas. Year 16, Pharmouthi 26.” Commentary: Merismos was not a specific tax, but part of the tax burden concerning a specific community.