A visit to the Kraków Archaeological Museum is a unique opportunity to go
back in time to the world of prehistoric Małopolska. The museum focuses
on the ancient history of the present Małopolska Province and depicts the
types of conditions in which our ancestors lived. It looks at the different
methods used to gather food throughout the period from ancient times to
the Middle Ages and demonstrates what the ancient people of Małopolska
looked like (what clothes they wore, how they lived, how they decorated
their outfits and what weapons they used).
Apart from Polish collections, the Museum houses some exhibits from other
parts of the world: Egypt, Asia Minor and Peru. The exhibition Gods of
Ancient Egypt presents monuments from the one of the greatest ancient
centres of culture. The most valuable exhibits include sarcophagi from El-
Gamhud and an extensive collection ofjewellery and figures depicting
Egyptian gods. The Museum's collection also houses the contents of the
tomb of the Scythian princess(dating back to the 3rd century B.C.) which
contains various vessels, golden fragments of the princess's outfit and her
jewellery.

Elaborated by Olga Kasztelewicz, Joanna Kotarba,
Licencja Creative Commons

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Poland License.

Photograph by Marek Antoniusz Święch, arch. MIK (2012),
Licencja Creative Commons

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Poland License.

www.ma.krakow.pl

 

ul. Senacka 3,
31-002 Kraków


phone 12 422 71 00
phone 12 422 75 60
Fax 12 422 77 61
page museum

Opening hours

January  — June
Monday
9.00 — 15.00
Tuesday
9.00 — 18.00
Wednesday
9.00 — 15.00
Thursday
9.00 — 18.00
Friday
9.00 — 15.00
Saturday
closed
Sunday
11.00 — 16.00
July  — August
Monday  — Friday
10.00 — 17.00
Saturday
closed
Sunday
10.00 — 15.00
September  — December
Monday
9.00 — 15.00
Tuesday
9.00 — 18.00
Wednesday
9.00 — 15.00
Thursday
9.00 — 18.00
Friday
9.00 — 15.00
Saturday
closed
Sunday
11.00 — 16.00

Ticket Prices

The Main Building regular pass 12 PLN reduced pass 7 PLN The Main Building — permanent exhibitions normal 10 PLN reduced 6 PLN The Main Building — temporary exhibitions normal 8 PLN reduced 5 PLN The underground exhibition normal 4 PLN reduced 3 PLN Garden 2 PLN
Sunday — free admission

Feminine dress from Sudan

Pochodzący z Sudanu islamski strój kobiecy przypuszczalnie jest datowany na XIX wiek. Wykonany z czerwonego jedwabiu, haftowany złotymi i srebrnymi nićmi, wykończenia z koronkowej tasiemki. Długość szaty wynosi 109 cm, a największa szerokość 109 cm. Głównymi elementami haftu są stylizowane motywy roślinne...

Svetovid – Zbruch Idol

The statue presented here was found in 1848 in the Zbruch River near the village of Liczkowce (today: Lychkivtsi) (Ternopil Oblast, Ukraine). The sculpture is a four-sided pillar topped with four faces under a tall hat. Below there are three figural representations in the three-tier arrangement, with the division marked with plastic slats. Three sides of the lowest tier depict a kneeling figure with raised arms. In one case, it is a man (the moustache is marked)...

Necklace from Czersk

Silver necklace made of several strands of double stranded wire. The ends of the necklace are forged in the lenticular plate form, decorated on one ornament, completed with hook and eye fastening.

Horn sceptre, the so-called bâton de commendement, from Maszycka Cave

The find comes from the excavations conducted in the Maszycka Cave by Gotfryd Ossowski in 1883 and is related with reindeer hunters (the so-called Magdalenian culture). The object was made from reindeer antlers. It is almost 30 cm long. It was found among the remains of several people (men, women and children).

Fragment of a Coptic fabric (“orbiculus”)

Textile executed in tapestry weave and flying-shuttle technique. This element originates from Coptic tunic. The preserved fragment inside an aorbiculus is covered with decoration of the Flechtknoten type.

Zoomorphic vessel

The vessel comes from the collection of Władysław Kluger, it is from 1876. It has the shape of the lama head with wide outflow.

Frog-shaped vessel

The vessel comes from the collection of Władysław Kluger, it is from 1876. Anatomical details of the frog and decorations made ​​in the form of zigzags are painted with red paint around the vessel.

Anthropomorphic vessel

Obiekt pochodzi z kolekcji Władysława Klugera z 1876 roku. Kuliste naczynie z umieszczoną na szczycie, przy wylewie leżącą postacią ludzką.

Zoomorphic vessel (Chimú culture)

The vessel comes from the collection of Władysław Kluger from 1876. It has two circular bellies and two beaks: one in the shape of a bird’s head, the other one tall and straight, both conjoined with a curved handle. On the belly, there are panels with straps of...

Stela of man from Kom Abou Billou

Banquet scene inside an aedicula consisting of two flat columns supporting a semicircular pediment, now lost. A papyrus capital is still visible on the column to the right. The deceased is depicted as a partaker in a banquet, reclining on a couch with two pillows and mattress. Horizontal engraved lines below the representation were intended for an inscription.

Tomb stele from Ginari Tafah 2

The stele comes from the Christian necropolis in Lower Nubia (present day Egypt). It is one of the three stelae from that region presented on our website and one of seven stelae stored in Poland. The inscription placed on the stele is written in the Old Nubian language, which is indicated, for example, by the use of colons for dividing numbers.

Tomb stele from Ginari Tafah 3

The third of the tomb steles found in the region of Lower Nubia, which belongs to the Archaeological Museum of Kraków. Similarly to the two remaining ones, the stele bears an inscription in the Old Nubian language. The inscription on the stele contains numerous grammar mistakes, mostly influenced by the Old Nubian language.

Fragment of stela with three figures

The composition appears in an engraved aedicula with a triangular pediment supported on straight columns (the column on the right is preserved). Two figures are depicted on the stela: a woman reclining on a couch and another woman standing before her in a prayerful attitude. The scene may be reconstructed despite considerable damage; presumably there was a third praying figure depicted on the right side.

Funerary stela pediment

The dove, a symbol of the Holy Spirit, is popular in Christian iconography. The motif is frequent in Coptic art, mainly on funerary stelae presenting the same kind of composition as above. A praying figure with two crosses or a stylized crux gemmata cross is usually shown between the columns. The motif of a dove is also known from wall painting; numerous representations of doves are known from murals in the hermitages at Esna in Upper Egypt and elsewhere.

Stela of Bes from Kom Abu Billou

The stela with deceased shown in prayer in the inly such example among the objects from Kom Abou Billou in Polish collections. The style of a stela, dated to 300 based on the archeological context, is similar, although not exactly the same. Modeling of the details of the figure and of the dress suggests an earlier dating for this object.

Greek ostrakon – instructions to issue wine

Instructions to issue wine. Data: March 20, 15th indiction (6th–7th century) “To Martyrios, rogator. Deliver on the account of buccellarii three koloba of wine, that is koloba of wine 3, only. Written on 27th of Mesore, indiction XV. Pythidoros agreed.”

Stela with four figures from Kom Abu Billou

A “family” stela showing a married couple (?) and two children in prayerful attitudes, one above their feet and the other opposite them. The adults, who are missing the upper bodies and heads, are depicted on a coach with mattress, one in front of the other, supporting themselves each on the left elbow resting on two pillows. Compositions with several figures are rare on stelae from Kom Abu Billou.

Stela of woman from Kom Abou Billou

The upper preserved part of the stela shows an aedicula constructed of a semicircular pediment supported on two plain columns with papyrus capitals. The deceased is shown frontally, but with the right leg in profile. She is reclining on a mattress, supported on her left elbow resting on two pillows. In her right hand, which is unnaturally long, she holds a bowl. Her dress consists of a chiton and himation arranged in semicircular folds. The long her falling to her breasts is pushed back behind the ears. Her face has been hammered away. Opposite her there is an engraved representation of a sitting jackal. The animal with a long snout and raised tail is shown facing her.

Stela of man from Kom Abou Billou from the 1st half of the 3rd century

The deceased rests on a couch with mattress in a repetition of a composition that is already known from the Stela of the son of Chairemon and Isidora. The differences are insignificant: a wreath held in the extended right hand and a different arrangement of the feet, which are crossed in this case. Both the mattress and the pillows are decorated with rhomboids. The features of the face are not very clear, but a flat wide nose predominates.

Mithraic relief

The object presented here comes from Carnuntum, the Roman army camp and city situated on the Danube between Vienna and Bratislava. The bas-relief depicts a scene of a bull being killed by Mithra. The deity, dressed in a Roman tunica and wearing a Phrygian cap, is kneeling and supporting the animal with his left knee.