A visit to the Kraków Archaeological Museum is a unique opportunity to go
back in time to the world of prehistoric Małopolska. The museum focuses
on the ancient history of the present Małopolska Province and depicts the
types of conditions in which our ancestors lived. It looks at the different
methods used to gather food throughout the period from ancient times to
the Middle Ages and demonstrates what the ancient people of Małopolska
looked like (what clothes they wore, how they lived, how they decorated
their outfits and what weapons they used).
Apart from Polish collections, the Museum houses some exhibits from other
parts of the world: Egypt, Asia Minor and Peru. The exhibition Gods of
Ancient Egypt presents monuments from the one of the greatest ancient
centres of culture. The most valuable exhibits include sarcophagi from El-
Gamhud and an extensive collection ofjewellery and figures depicting
Egyptian gods. The Museum's collection also houses the contents of the
tomb of the Scythian princess(dating back to the 3rd century B.C.) which
contains various vessels, golden fragments of the princess's outfit and her
jewellery.

Elaborated by Olga Kasztelewicz, Joanna Kotarba,
Licencja Creative Commons

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Poland License.

Photograph by Marek Antoniusz Święch, arch. MIK (2012),
Licencja Creative Commons

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Poland License.

www.ma.krakow.pl

 

ul. Senacka 3,
31-002 Kraków


phone 12 422 71 00
phone 12 422 75 60
Fax 12 422 77 61
page museum

Opening hours

January  — June
Monday
9.00 — 15.00
Tuesday
9.00 — 18.00
Wednesday
9.00 — 15.00
Thursday
9.00 — 18.00
Friday
9.00 — 15.00
Saturday
closed
Sunday
11.00 — 16.00
July  — August
Monday  — Friday
10.00 — 17.00
Saturday
closed
Sunday
10.00 — 15.00
September  — December
Monday
9.00 — 15.00
Tuesday
9.00 — 18.00
Wednesday
9.00 — 15.00
Thursday
9.00 — 18.00
Friday
9.00 — 15.00
Saturday
closed
Sunday
11.00 — 16.00

Ticket Prices

The Main Building regular pass 12 PLN reduced pass 7 PLN The Main Building — permanent exhibitions normal 10 PLN reduced 6 PLN The Main Building — temporary exhibitions normal 8 PLN reduced 5 PLN The underground exhibition normal 4 PLN reduced 3 PLN Garden 2 PLN
Sunday — free admission

Hoard from Nowa Huta — Pleszów

It was discovered in August 1961 in the settlement of Pleszów. A part of the deposit was put in a clay pot with a volume of about 2 litres. The remaining part was scattered across a fairly large space. The treasure contains silver objects: coins and their fragments — 608 items, 129 fragments of ornaments, 341 cast pieces of silver and 8 pieces of lead. The treasure was hidden after 1037 and it weighs 2 532 g.

Horn sceptre, the so-called bâton de commendement, from Maszycka Cave

The find comes from the excavations conducted in the Maszycka Cave by Gotfryd Ossowski in 1883 and is related with reindeer hunters (the so-called Magdalenian culture). The object was made from reindeer antlers. It is almost 30 cm long. It was found among the remains of several people (men, women and children).

“Princely” grave from Jakuszowice near Kazimierza Wielka

The find is dated back to the 1st half of the 5th century (before 434). It is one of the most interesting pieces of proof of contact between the peoples inhabiting the area of southern Poland and the Huns in the 1st half of the 5th century. The grave was discovered by accident in 1911 while mining sand. The majority of the excavated objects were smuggled to Kraków over the then Russian-Austrian border.

A sword from Small Market in Kraków

The iron sword from the Mały Rynek [Small Market] Square in Kraków was discovered during the renovation of the square’s surface in 2007. So far, it is the only sword found in the archaeological research in the area of Kraków.

Stela of woman from Kom Abou Billou

The upper preserved part of the stela shows an aedicula constructed of a semicircular pediment supported on two plain columns with papyrus capitals. The deceased is shown frontally, but with the right leg in profile. She is reclining on a mattress, supported on her left elbow resting on two pillows. In her right hand, which is unnaturally long, she holds a bowl. Her dress consists of a chiton and himation arranged in semicircular folds. The long her falling to her breasts is pushed back behind the ears. Her face has been hammered away. Opposite her there is an engraved representation of a sitting jackal. The animal with a long snout and raised tail is shown facing her.

Funerary stela pediment

The dove, a symbol of the Holy Spirit, is popular in Christian iconography. The motif is frequent in Coptic art, mainly on funerary stelae presenting the same kind of composition as above. A praying figure with two crosses or a stylized crux gemmata cross is usually shown between the columns. The motif of a dove is also known from wall painting; numerous representations of doves are known from murals in the hermitages at Esna in Upper Egypt and elsewhere.

Bone plaque in the shape of a bull’s head from Bilche Zolote

This object was found in Bilcze Złote (now the Tarnopol region, Ukraine), in the Werteb cave in 1898, by Włodzimierz Demetrykiewicz. The badge is a part of the rich collection of Leon XX and Teresa Sapieh, which was handed over by agreement in 1904 to the Museum of Skills Academy in Kraków.

Costume of a Scythian princess from Ryzhanovka

Since 1887 the collection of the Archaeological Museum of Kraków has boasted the equipment of a rich Scythian female tomb situated under the mound of a kurgan, examined in Ryzhanovka near Zvenyhorodka in Ukraine by Gotfryd Ossowski, the first curator of the Museum of National Antiquities (from which today’s Archaeological Museum has originated) at the Polish Academy of Arts and Sciences in Kraków.

Greek inscription from Cirenaica

In ancient Greece, if you were harmed by someone whom you were unable to bring into court (e.g. a citizen of another city), you could seek compensation, with the consent of your polis, by seizing the property of the apprehended perpetrator or even the property of any other (innocent!) citizen of the same city from where the criminal came. This procedure was referred to as syle. Special places where individuals threatened with syle were offered sanctuary were known as asylia, which is the origin of today’s term “asylum”.

Tomb stele from Ginari Tafah 3

The third of the tomb steles found in the region of Lower Nubia, which belongs to the Archaeological Museum of Kraków. Similarly to the two remaining ones, the stele bears an inscription in the Old Nubian language. The inscription on the stele contains numerous grammar mistakes, mostly influenced by the Old Nubian language.

Fragment of a Coptic fabric (“orbiculus”)

Textile executed in tapestry weave and flying-shuttle technique. This element originates from Coptic tunic. The preserved fragment inside an aorbiculus is covered with decoration of the Flechtknoten type.

Celtic glass bead

The glass bead was accidently discovered during the surface research conducted in 1997 in the town of Dziewięcioły (District of Miechów, the Małopolska Province). It was made of yellow opaque glass...

Stele of the son of Chairemon and Isidora from Kom Abou Billou

The stele was purchased in Cairo at Eli Albert and Joseph Abermayor by soldiers of the Polish Independent Carpathian Rifle Brigade during WW II. The scene depicts a deceased man lying on a klinai and a female orant standing opposite. The man lying in the bed is dressed in a short-sleeved chiton and a himation rolled at the waist, wrapped around his left hand. In his right, outstretched hand he is holding a kantharos. The woman standing in front of him is depicted en face, she is dressed in the same way as the man and is raising her hands in a gesture of prayer. Under the scene an inscription is placed. The name of the deceased has been preserved only partially; perhaps it was Sosas. The name of his father was Chairemon; the name of Isidora is also there, popular in Egypt in the Roman period. The figures are bound together by family ties.

Stela of man from Kom Abou Billou

Banquet scene inside an aedicula consisting of two flat columns supporting a semicircular pediment, now lost. A papyrus capital is still visible on the column to the right. The deceased is depicted as a partaker in a banquet, reclining on a couch with two pillows and mattress. Horizontal engraved lines below the representation were intended for an inscription.

Stela of Bes from Kom Abu Billou

The stela with deceased shown in prayer in the inly such example among the objects from Kom Abou Billou in Polish collections. The style of a stela, dated to 300 based on the archeological context, is similar, although not exactly the same. Modeling of the details of the figure and of the dress suggests an earlier dating for this object.

Tomb stele from Ginari Tafah 2

The stele comes from the Christian necropolis in Lower Nubia (present day Egypt). It is one of the three stelae from that region presented on our website and one of seven stelae stored in Poland. The inscription placed on the stele is written in the Old Nubian language, which is indicated, for example, by the use of colons for dividing numbers.

Bronze hoard from Stefkowa

Treasure consists of objects found that had been collected and deliberately hidden (deposited), usually in the ground, for some specific reason. Deposits of treasure from the Bronze and early Iron Age are especially numerous; these usually included ornaments, tools, weapons and sometimes bronze vessels.

The hoard with iron axe-like bars (“grzywna”) from 13 Kanonicza Street in Kraków

This treasure was found during rescue investigations in the basements of the backyard annex at 13 Kanonicza Street in Kraków in 1979. The deposit fell under the core of the early medieval bank of Okol. It was hidden in a pit measuring 108 x 210 cm, at a depth of about 100 cm, under walls partially covered with oak and fir wood...

Hoard from Witów

A treasure of four gold Roman coins from the 5th century AD was found in Witów. It contains three solidi of Emperor Theodosius II (402–450) and one solidus of Emperor Valentinian II (424–455). The first group of coins presents a bust in an armour on the obverse. The name of the emperor is inscribed on the rim — DN THEODOSI-VS P.F. AVG.

Stela of man from Kom Abou Billou from the 1st half of the 3rd century

The deceased rests on a couch with mattress in a repetition of a composition that is already known from the Stela of the son of Chairemon and Isidora. The differences are insignificant: a wreath held in the extended right hand and a different arrangement of the feet, which are crossed in this case. Both the mattress and the pillows are decorated with rhomboids. The features of the face are not very clear, but a flat wide nose predominates.